Henderson Adoption Lawyer, Nevada

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Larry C. Johns

Administrative Law, Adoption, Dispute Resolution, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura L Johns

Administrative Law, Adoption, Dispute Resolution, Bankruptcy
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John A Clement

Adoption, Business Organization, Commercial Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy
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Glen Ray Winters

Bankruptcy, Adoption, Elder Law, Immigration
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Shoshana Kunin-leavitt

Accident & Injury, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Alan J. Buttell

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Dillon G. Coil

Labor Law, Adoption, Business, Intellectual Property
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christy Brad Escobar

Adoption, Bad Faith Insurance, Corporate, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

William J. Crock

Adoption, Car Accident, Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Kari J. Hanratty

Estate Planning, Family Law, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

St. James Village, Inc. v. Cunningham

... We conclude that the statement made in Swenson indicating that fixed easements cannot be moved is overbroad, and determine that adoption of section 4.8 of the Restatement (Third) of Property is warranted in those circumstances where the creating instrument does not ...

IN THE MATTER OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AS TO SMMD

... and physical custody of [the children] be returned to the Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribal Social Services." The tribal court then entered an order accepting "all jurisdiction over these proceedings." [2] In March 2008, the tribal court, after a hearing, ordered the adoption of SMMD ...

IN RE SMMD

... and physical custody of [the children] be returned to the Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribal Social Services." The tribal court then entered an order accepting "all jurisdiction over these proceedings." [2] In March 2008, the tribal court, after a hearing, ordered the adoption of SMMD ...