Jersey Trusts Lawyer, Georgia

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Deborah Murphy Dickson

Trusts, Elder Law, Military, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Deborah Dickson

Trusts, Elder Law, Military, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Janet Grayson

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Anthony O. L. Powell

Eminent Domain, Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years
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John Hollingsworth

Trusts, Business & Trade, Commercial Real Estate, Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Pamela Roberts Nix

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Emmett J Arnold

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

SUMMARY PROBATE

A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are ... (more...)
A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are complicated, but a few examples include estates worth up to $100,000 in California; New York estates where property, excluding real estate and amounts that must be set aside for surviving family members, is worth $20,000 or less; and Texas estates where the value of property doesn't exceed what is needed to pay a family allowance and certain creditors.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

IRREVOCABLE TRUST

A permanent trust. Once you create it, it cannot be revoked, amended or changed in any way.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cronic v. Baker

... Subsequently, the Attorney General of Georgia brought suit against Cronic in superior court, contending that both Item III(4) and III(5) of the Will created charitable trusts and that Cronic breached his fiduciary duties by failing to fully fund them. ...

Hood v. Todd

... trustee of the respective residuary trust established for her benefit. No other trustees of any other potential trusts (other than a successor trustee) are named. Todd claims to be Buffington's biological daughter, asserting that she ...

PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS, LLP v. Bassett

... A Cobb County jury returned a $10 million verdict in favor of William Bassett as the trustee for four private trusts in the trusts' claim for negligent misrepresentation against the accounting firm Pricewaterhouse-Coopers, LLP ("PwC"), as the successor to Coopers & Lybrand, LLP ...