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Atlanta Trusts Lawyer, Georgia


Stephen Michael Scriber Lawyer

Stephen Michael Scriber

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Estate Administration

Stephen Scriber, a graduate of Duke University School of Law, is an experienced wills, trusts, and estate planning practitioner based in Midtown. In a... (more)

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800-830-8670

Ron  Debranski Lawyer

Ron Debranski

VERIFIED
Family Law, Real Estate, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate, Trusts

Debranski & Associates, LLC is a general practice law firm. We are Family Attorneys serving North Metro Atlanta in the areas of Business law, Family l... (more)

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800-975-1431

T. Michele Reddick

Wills & Probate, Corporate, Wills, Trusts, Intellectual Property
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Brian S. Limbocker

Wills, Bankruptcy, Trusts, Estate Planning, Litigation
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W. Frank Ward

Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
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James M. Coyle

Corporate, Estate Planning, Tax, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Woodrow Stewart

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Tax, Trusts

Debra Scott

Estate, Trusts, Medicare & Medicaid, Wills & Probate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kristina M. Jones

Products Liability, Securities, Business, Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Douglas Lambert

Trusts, Commercial Real Estate, Estate, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

ABSTRACT OF TRUST

A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract... (more...)
A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract of trust to a financial organization or other institution to prove that you have established a valid living trust, without revealing specifics that you want to keep private. In some states, this document is called a 'certification of trust.'

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

ANCILLARY PROBATE

A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are... (more...)
A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are necessary if the deceased person owned real estate in another state.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cronic v. Baker

... Subsequently, the Attorney General of Georgia brought suit against Cronic in superior court, contending that both Item III(4) and III(5) of the Will created charitable trusts and that Cronic breached his fiduciary duties by failing to fully fund them. ...

Hood v. Todd

... trustee of the respective residuary trust established for her benefit. No other trustees of any other potential trusts (other than a successor trustee) are named. Todd claims to be Buffington's biological daughter, asserting that she ...

PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS, LLP v. Bassett

... A Cobb County jury returned a $10 million verdict in favor of William Bassett as the trustee for four private trusts in the trusts' claim for negligent misrepresentation against the accounting firm Pricewaterhouse-Coopers, LLP ("PwC"), as the successor to Coopers & Lybrand, LLP ...