Lansing Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Michigan

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Ronald T. Berry Lawyer

Ronald T. Berry

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation

Mr. Berry is the founder and president of the Berry Law Offices, PLC. Prior to founding the firm, Mr. Berry began his legal career as an associate att... (more)

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800-689-4920

Donald J. Baranski Lawyer

Donald J. Baranski

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Employment, Criminal, Consumer Bankruptcy
Thirty years in general practice

Donald J. Baranski received his Bachelor of Arts in Humanities Pre Law, from Michigan State University. This was a triple major of American History, P... (more)

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800-970-5860

Andria M. Ditschman

Dispute Resolution, Municipal, Wills & Probate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

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M. Dennis Esmay

Accident & Injury, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years
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Peter C. Samouris

Federal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Robert W. Dietrich

Transportation & Shipping, Social Security -- Disability, Government Agencies, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Kara Henigan Hope

Family Law, Divorce, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Stuart R. Shafer

Litigation, Deportation, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert G. Mathis

Domestic Violence & Neglect, Elder Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Larissa Ann Overley Zubac

Contract, Employee Rights, Divorce, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

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