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Las Vegas Estate Lawyer, Nevada


G. Mark  Albright Lawyer

G. Mark Albright

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Business, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate Other, Estate
A-V rated Full Service Law law firm.

Mr. Albright is a practicing lawyer in Las Vegas, NV, he has been serving Las Vegas for over 40 years. Mr. Albright practices in the areas of Civil Li... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

702-384-7111

Robert Wayne Lueck Lawyer

Robert Wayne Lueck

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Arbitration, Dispute Resolution, Mediation

While serving as a Family Court Judge Robert Lueck identified the important need for alternative methods of settling divorces outside of the over-crow... (more)

Sean Michael Tanko Lawyer

Sean Michael Tanko

VERIFIED
Estate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney
Estate Planning, Probate and Trust Administration

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-881-3120

David M. Grant Lawyer

David M. Grant

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Gift Taxation

David has an AV® Peer Review Rating from Martindale Hubble. He has also been recognized as a Mountain States (NV, UT, MT, ID and WY) Rising Star by ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-974-8521

Kari J. Hanratty

Family Law, Estate Planning, Child Support, Adoption, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michelle L. Abrams

Estate, Estate Planning, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel T. Foley

Accident & Injury, Business, Estate, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marilyn Fine

Business Organization, Eminent Domain, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bradley J. Hofland

Business Organization, Family Law, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shelley D. Krohn

Bankruptcy, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

800-923-0641

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Las Vegas Estate Lawyers and Las Vegas Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

EXECUTOR

The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's... (more...)
The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's left, as specified in the will. The executor also handles any probate court proceedings and notifies people and organizations of the death. Also called personal representatives.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

BENEFICIARY

A person or organization legally entitled to receive benefits through a legal device, such as a will, trust or life insurance policy.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.