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Joshua ("Josh") Tomsheck

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Attorney Josh Tomsheck is a Partner in the Las Vegas Trial Lawyer firm of Hofland & Tomsheck and heads both the Criminal Trial and Personal Injury Pra... (more)

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800-653-0570

Nick  Wooldridge Lawyer

Nick Wooldridge

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, RICO Act, White Collar Crime

Are you or a loved one facing criminal allegations? Are you or your business being investigated by the authorities? Or do you have reason to believe t... (more)

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800-806-4521

Daria A. Panoff Lawyer

Daria A. Panoff

VERIFIED
Criminal, White Collar Crime, Juvenile Law, DUI-DWI, Traffic

Las Vegas criminal defense attorney Daria A. Panoff started her legal career apprenticing for John Momot, one of the city's preeminent criminal defens... (more)

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702-333-3673

Jeremy Wood

White Collar Crime, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Mace J. Yampolsky

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

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Peter James Christiansen

Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Lawrence C. Hill

White Collar Crime, Criminal, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

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Jeffrey Blaine Setness

Litigation, State Government, Gift Taxation, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Jeffrey B. Setness

Litigation, State Government, Gift Taxation, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Julian R. Gregory

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.