Lees Summit Trusts Lawyer, Missouri


Steven C. Krueger

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Contract, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott R. Manuel

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Buford L. Farrington

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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A. Glenn Sowders

Wills & Probate, Agriculture, Wills, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Danny L. Curtis

Power of Attorney, Litigation, Trusts, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Terry Lawrence Williams

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Ronald S. Bronstein

Trusts, Estate Planning, Corporate, Licensing
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard W. Shankland

Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney, Estate Planning, Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Michael Robert Thiessen

Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Richard W Shankland

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to t... (more...)
Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to the state. Some states have public administrators who are responsible for temporarily preserving the assets of an estate if there are disputes about specific provisions in the will or about who will be appointed the regular administrator.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Wilson v. Rhodes

... 875 JEFFREY W. BATES, Chief Judge. The trial court granted a summary judgment requiring the successor trustees of two trusts to distribute certain assets to the personal representative of a decedent's estate. ... In September 1992, Husband and Wife established individual trusts. ...

Hardt v. Vitae Foundation, Inc.

... This rule applied to gifts both to charitable trusts and charitable corporations and was made primarily to prevent potential beneficiaries without a "special interest" in the gift from "vex[ing]" public charities with "frequent suits, possibly based on an inadequate investigation." Id. ...

Schumacher v. Schumacher

... Upon Grantor's death in May of 1998, the revocable trust split into three separate trusts: a qualified terminable interest property trust ("QTIP trust"), a marital trust, and a family trust. Topper is the sole trustee of the three trusts. ...