Littleton Estate Lawyer, Colorado

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Joe  Pickard Lawyer

Joe Pickard

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Business Organization, Estate

Joe moved to Colorado from Texas in 1969. He is the oldest of 10 siblings. He Littleton Colorado Lawyer Attorneygraduated from Mullen High School, whe... (more)

Ronnie  Fischer Lawyer

Ronnie Fischer

VERIFIED
General Practice
I provide a broad range of legal services to both individuals and businesses.

Ronnie was born and raised in New York. He has always had a passion for the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Throughout high school, college, and law school ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-823-9280

Erika Alese Gebhardt Lawyer

Erika Alese Gebhardt

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate

Erika Gebhardt practices exclusively family law and estate planning. Erika began her career in family law when she worked as an extern at the firm dur... (more)

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CONTACT

800-715-8210

Marco  Chayet Lawyer

Marco Chayet

VERIFIED
Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Medicare & Medicaid

During law school, Mr. Chayet's grandmother, Letty Milstein, was the principle party in one of the most controversial and public elder law cases in th... (more)

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CONTACT

800-295-7850

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James Vernon Pearson Lawyer

James Vernon Pearson

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Employment
Serious representation for when it matters the most. Call me now!

Mr. Pearson has 30 years experience in business law, business management and consulting. He has received a Martindale-Hubbell top AV@ rating for attor... (more)

Jo  Stone Lawyer

Jo Stone

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Business, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Jo Stone is a Colorado native, whose grandparents were homesteaders in eastern Colorado. Jo has both her bachelors and masters degrees in English lite... (more)

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CONTACT

800-708-9521

Walter M. Kelly

Estate Administration, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Harmon S. Graves

Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carolyn Moller Duncan

Living Wills, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

SUMMARY PROBATE

A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are ... (more...)
A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are complicated, but a few examples include estates worth up to $100,000 in California; New York estates where property, excluding real estate and amounts that must be set aside for surviving family members, is worth $20,000 or less; and Texas estates where the value of property doesn't exceed what is needed to pay a family allowance and certain creditors.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

DISCHARGE (OF PROBATE ADMINISTRATOR)

A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties hav... (more...)
A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties have been completed but may happen sooner if the executor or administrator wishes to withdraw or is dismissed.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

ABSTRACT OF TRUST

A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract... (more...)
A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract of trust to a financial organization or other institution to prove that you have established a valid living trust, without revealing specifics that you want to keep private. In some states, this document is called a 'certification of trust.'