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Louisville Criminal Lawyer, Kentucky


Larry  Forman Lawyer

Larry Forman

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury
SuperLawyers Rising Star and Louisville Magazine Top Lawyer

Mr. Forman's Top Awards: 2015-17 Nation's Top One Percent Attorney by the National Association of Distinguished Counsel, 2016 Louisville Magazine Top ... (more)

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800-926-1391

Sean Patrick Tillman Lawyer

Sean Patrick Tillman

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Consumer Bankruptcy
Small Firm. Big Results.

Sean Tillman is a native of Louisville, Kentucky and a second generation attorney. He began his career with the law firm of Sales, Tillman, Wallbaum, ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-978-7391

David M. Schuler Lawyer

David M. Schuler

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Car Accident, Slip & Fall Accident, Wrongful Death, Criminal
Strong trial attorneys who pull ahead of the rest.

David Schuler is an assertive, experienced, auto accident attorney in Kentucky who is a dedicated advocate for injured people and those accused of cri... (more)

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502-568-9000

Sean P Paris Lawyer

Sean P Paris

VERIFIED
Criminal, Litigation, Real Estate, Federal
Serious representation for when it matters the most. Call me now!

Mr. Paris has over 20 years' experience in both criminal and civil litigation matters. He has received a Martindale-Hubbell top AV rating for attorney... (more)

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Harley N. Blankenship Lawyer

Harley N. Blankenship

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

Harley Blankenship is a practicing lawyer in Louisville, KY after being admitted to the Kentucky Bar in 1970. He received his Juris Doctor in 1970 fro... (more)

Thomas M Denbow Lawyer

Thomas M Denbow

VERIFIED
Family Law, Trusts, Real Estate, Criminal, Wills & Probate

Thomas M. Denbow has over 30 years of experience as a trial lawyer and handled thousands of cases. A founding partner of O’Bryan & Denbow in 1976, h... (more)

James Timothy Crawford Lawyer

James Timothy Crawford

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

J. Tim Crawford is a U.S. Navy veteran and the premier attorney in Shelbyville, Kentucky. The Law Offices of J. Tim Crawford focus our practice of law... (more)

Theodore W. Walton

Bad Faith, Corporate, Consumer Protection, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Vincent Aprile

Criminal, Employment, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kyle David Kaiman

Premises Liability, Wrongful Death, Election & Political, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Com. v. Padilla

... Supreme Court of Kentucky. January 24, 2008. Rehearing Denied June 19, 2008. 483 Jack Conway, Attorney General of Kentucky, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Office of the Attorney General, Frankfort, KY, Counsel for Appellant. ...

Hartsfield v. Com.

... They are testimonial when the circumstances objectively indicate that there is no such ongoing emergency, and that the primary purpose of the interrogation is to establish or prove past events potentially 244 relevant to later criminal prosecution. [18]. ...

Leonard v. Com.

... for Appellant. Jack Conway, Attorney General, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Frankfort, KY, for Appellee. Opinion of the Court by Justice NOBLE. Appellant ...