Louisville Criminal Lawyer, Kentucky


Sean Patrick Tillman Lawyer

Sean Patrick Tillman

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Consumer Bankruptcy
Small Firm. Big Results.

Sean Tillman is a native of Louisville, Kentucky and a second generation attorney. He began his career with the law firm of Sales, Tillman, Wallbaum, ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-978-7391

Larry  Forman Lawyer

Larry Forman

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury
SuperLawyers Rising Star and Louisville Magazine Top Lawyer

Mr. Forman's Top Awards: 2015-17 Nation's Top One Percent Attorney by the National Association of Distinguished Counsel, 2016 Louisville Magazine Top ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-926-1391

David M. Schuler Lawyer

David M. Schuler

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Car Accident, Slip & Fall Accident, Wrongful Death, Criminal
Strong trial attorneys who pull ahead of the rest.

David Schuler is an assertive, experienced, auto accident attorney in Kentucky who is a dedicated advocate for injured people and those accused of cri... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

502-568-9000

Mark D Chandler Lawyer

Mark D Chandler

VERIFIED
Search & Seizure Protections, Criminal, Misdemeanor

Mark Chandler is a practicing lawyer in the state of Kentucky.

Speak with Lawyer.com
Harley N. Blankenship Lawyer

Harley N. Blankenship

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

Harley Blankenship is a practicing lawyer in Louisville, KY after being admitted to the Kentucky Bar in 1970. He received his Juris Doctor in 1970 fro... (more)

Thomas M Denbow Lawyer

Thomas M Denbow

VERIFIED
Family Law, Trusts, Real Estate, Criminal, Wills & Probate

Thomas M. Denbow has over 30 years of experience as a trial lawyer and handled thousands of cases. A founding partner of O’Bryan & Denbow in 1976, h... (more)

Sean P. Paris Lawyer

Sean P. Paris

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate, Criminal
Serious representation for when it matters the most. Call me now!

Mr. Paris has over 20 years' experience in both family law and civil litigation matters. He has received a Martindale-Hubbell top AV rating for attorn... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-392-3301

John Christopher Robinson Lawyer

John Christopher Robinson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Workers' Compensation
Representing the INJURED and FINANCIALLY DISTRESSED forover two decades. Experience is Strength.

John Christopher Robinson was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky on May 5, 1970. He graduated from Shelby County High School before attending Transylv... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-687-3761

Theodore W. Walton

Bad Faith, Corporate, Consumer Protection, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Vincent Aprile

Criminal, Employment, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Louisville Criminal Lawyers and Louisville Criminal Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Criminal practice areas such as DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic matters.

LEGAL TERMS

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT

The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced '... (more...)
The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced 'to a moral certainty.' The jury must be convinced that the defendant committed each element of the crime before returning a guilty verdict.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

BURDEN OF PROOF

A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convi... (more...)
A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convince the judge or jury 'by a preponderance of the evidence' that the plaintiff's version is true -- that is, over 50% of the believable evidence is in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, because a person's liberty is at stake, the government has a harder job, and must convince the judge or jury beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Com. v. Padilla

... Supreme Court of Kentucky. January 24, 2008. Rehearing Denied June 19, 2008. 483 Jack Conway, Attorney General of Kentucky, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Office of the Attorney General, Frankfort, KY, Counsel for Appellant. ...

Hartsfield v. Com.

... They are testimonial when the circumstances objectively indicate that there is no such ongoing emergency, and that the primary purpose of the interrogation is to establish or prove past events potentially 244 relevant to later criminal prosecution. [18]. ...

Leonard v. Com.

... for Appellant. Jack Conway, Attorney General, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Frankfort, KY, for Appellee. Opinion of the Court by Justice NOBLE. Appellant ...