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Louisville Criminal Lawyer, Kentucky


Larry  Forman Lawyer

Larry Forman

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury
SuperLawyers Rising Star and Louisville Magazine Top Lawyer

Mr. Forman's Top Awards: 2015-17 Nation's Top One Percent Attorney by the National Association of Distinguished Counsel, 2016 Louisville Magazine Top ... (more)

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800-926-1391

Sean Patrick Tillman Lawyer

Sean Patrick Tillman

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Consumer Bankruptcy
Small Firm. Big Results.

Sean Tillman is a native of Louisville, Kentucky and a second generation attorney. He began his career with the law firm of Sales, Tillman, Wallbaum, ... (more)

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800-978-7391

David M. Schuler Lawyer

David M. Schuler

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Car Accident, Slip & Fall Accident, Wrongful Death, Criminal
Strong trial attorneys who pull ahead of the rest.

David Schuler is an assertive, experienced, auto accident attorney in Kentucky who is a dedicated advocate for injured people and those accused of cri... (more)

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502-568-9000

Harley N. Blankenship Lawyer

Harley N. Blankenship

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

Harley Blankenship is a practicing lawyer in Louisville, KY after being admitted to the Kentucky Bar in 1970. He received his Juris Doctor in 1970 fro... (more)

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Thomas M Denbow Lawyer

Thomas M Denbow

VERIFIED
Family Law, Trusts, Real Estate, Criminal, Wills & Probate

Thomas M. Denbow has over 30 years of experience as a trial lawyer and handled thousands of cases. A founding partner of O’Bryan & Denbow in 1976, h... (more)

James Timothy Crawford Lawyer

James Timothy Crawford

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

J. Tim Crawford is a U.S. Navy veteran and the premier attorney in Shelbyville, Kentucky. The Law Offices of J. Tim Crawford focus our practice of law... (more)

Theodore W. Walton

Bad Faith, Corporate, Consumer Protection, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Vincent Aprile

Criminal, Employment, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kyle David Kaiman

Premises Liability, Wrongful Death, Election & Political, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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William M. Butler

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Criminal, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Com. v. Padilla

... Supreme Court of Kentucky. January 24, 2008. Rehearing Denied June 19, 2008. 483 Jack Conway, Attorney General of Kentucky, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Office of the Attorney General, Frankfort, KY, Counsel for Appellant. ...

Hartsfield v. Com.

... They are testimonial when the circumstances objectively indicate that there is no such ongoing emergency, and that the primary purpose of the interrogation is to establish or prove past events potentially 244 relevant to later criminal prosecution. [18]. ...

Leonard v. Com.

... for Appellant. Jack Conway, Attorney General, David A. Smith, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Attorney General, Criminal Appellate Division, Frankfort, KY, for Appellee. Opinion of the Court by Justice NOBLE. Appellant ...