Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Miami White Collar Crime Lawyer, Florida

Sponsored Law Firm


Ayuban Antonio Tomas Lawyer

Ayuban Antonio Tomas

VERIFIED
Tax, Criminal, Tax Litigation, Felony, White Collar Crime

A. Antonio Tomas is a Board Certified Tax Lawyer and a Certified Public Accountant. Mr. Tomas's practice focuses on two main areas: Tax Law and Cri... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-813-3160

Alan S. Ross Lawyer

Alan S. Ross

VERIFIED
Criminal, White Collar Crime, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Mr. Ross is a native Floridian, born and raised in Miami. After graduating from the University of Miami with a degree in Business Administration, he g... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-824-6580

Ralph Steven Behr Lawyer

Ralph Steven Behr

VERIFIED
Criminal, White Collar Crime, RICO Act, Felony, Misdemeanor
Florida State and Federal Criminal Trials / New York State and Federal Criminal trials

Attorney Ralph Behr specializes in criminal law and is board certified by the Florida Bar in Criminal Trials. As a criminal defense lawyer he pract... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-952-8471

Young  Tindall Lawyer

Young Tindall

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Lifetime Broward County resident. Former police officer, state investigator and college professor. Florida Bar member since 1977. Served on several Fl... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-976-4730

Speak with Lawyer.com

Clayton Reed Kaeiser

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Litigation, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Jeffrey D. Feldman

Corporate, Intellectual Property, White Collar Crime, Litigation, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Donald I. Bierman

Criminal, Licensing, Professional Responsibility, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lilly Ann Sanchez

Criminal, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph Alan Sacher

Securities, Corporate, Contract, Litigation, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

Orlando do Campo

Criminal, Federal, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find Miami White Collar Crime Lawyers and Miami White Collar Crime Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

MENS REA

The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental s... (more...)
The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental state (the mens rea). The mens rea of robbery, for example, is the intent to permanently deprive the owner of his property.

JUSTICE SYSTEM

A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal... (more...)
A term lawyers use to describe the courts and other bureaucracies that handle American's criminal legal business, including offices of various state and federal prosecutors and public defenders. Many people caught up in this system refer to it by less flattering names.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.