Newport News Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Virginia


Casey  Chmielewski Lawyer

Casey Chmielewski

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
Outstanding service and a reasonable price

As the managing partner of the firm, Casey is responsible for the day to day operations of the firm's two office locations. In addition to managing th... (more)

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CONTACT

800-659-5191

Jennifer J Sherwood Lawyer

Jennifer J Sherwood

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Collection
Affordable Reliable and Available

Jennifer Sherwood is a practicing lawyer in Hampton Roads Virginia with a focus on Custody Disputes and Consumer Protection.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-792-5190

Paul Everette Thomas Lawyer

Paul Everette Thomas

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Determined, Experienced, and Effective.

Paul Thomas is an experienced lawyer proudly serving Virginia Beach, Virginia and the neighboring communities. He practices law in the following area... (more)

Paul  Freeman Lawyer

Paul Freeman

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Motor Vehicle, Lawsuit & Dispute

Lawyer Paul Freeman earned his Bachelor of Science degree at Norfolk State University and his master’s degree at the same university. Following his ... (more)

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Rachel S. Gunther Lawyer

Rachel S. Gunther

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Criminal

Rachel Gunther P.C. has locations in Virginia Beach, VA and Hertford, NC. We take pride in representing clients throughout Hampton Roads, Virginia an... (more)

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CONTACT

757-671-3352

Richard Joseph Davis Lawyer

Richard Joseph Davis

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI

Mr. Davis was born and raised in Portsmouth. He served on the staff of U.S. Senator Charles S. Robb then attended Nova Southeastern University Law Sch... (more)

Terrence K. Martin Lawyer

Terrence K. Martin

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Estate, Real Estate

I am attorney Terrence K. martin of the Law Office of Terry Martin and Associates. I know that my clients come to me in times of real need, and I am c... (more)

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CONTACT

800-898-6491

Christie M. Wilson

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher Reagen

Family Law, Child Support, Admiralty & Maritime, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Heather Kaylie Little

Farms, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Newport News Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Newport News Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.