Newton County, GA Divorce & Family Law Lawyers


Stephen Lee Coxen Lawyer

Stephen Lee Coxen

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Criminal

A native of Fitzgerald, Georgia, Mr. Coxen moved to the Atlanta area in 2000 while attending law school at Georgia State University College of Law. Th... (more)

L. Stanford Cox

Federal Trial Practice, Government, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Ava J. Winborne

Family Law, Elder Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

John Ludwig Strauss

Federal Trial Practice, Government, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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William Forbes Elliott

Estate, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Bryan Herbert Frost

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Criminal, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Steven A. Hathorn

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Samuel David Ozburn

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Anthony Brackett Sandberg

Wills & Probate, Employment, Divorce & Family Law, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Samuel D. Ozburn

Government, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.