Plano DUI-DWI Lawyer, Texas

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Hunter A. Biederman Lawyer

Hunter A. Biederman

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law
The “Go to Guy for DWIs”.

Hunter Biederman, often referred to as the “Go to Guy for DWIs” is a founding partner of the Law Offices of Biederman & Burleson P.L.L.C., located... (more)

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469-333-3333

Darlina  Crowder Lawyer

Darlina Crowder

Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Attorney Darlina C. Crowder provides criminal defense representation for clients in the Plano, Texas area. She has been practicing law in the U.S. Dis... (more)

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214-303-9600

Jay  Bishop Lawyer

Jay Bishop

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI

Jay Bishop proudly serves Dallas, TX and the neighboring communities in the areas of DUI-DWI and Family law.

Knox  Fitzpatrick Lawyer

Knox Fitzpatrick

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Accident & Injury, Government Agencies, Lawsuit & Dispute

After earning a statewide reputation for excellence as a prosecutor, Knox Fitzpatrick, in 1994, brought his formidable trial skills and gift for legal... (more)

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Kimberly Griffin Tucker

DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Richard E. Weaver

Farms, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Deborah Harrison

Family Law, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Hank Judin

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Michael Crowder

Constitutional Law, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal
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John A Williamson

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Family Law, White Collar Crime
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LEGAL TERMS

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

PROBABLE CAUSE

The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a searc... (more...)
The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a search warrant allowing the police to conduct a search or arrest a suspect. Reliable information must show that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and the suspect is involved.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Amador v. State

... We reverse. 874 The Controversy [1]. On June 24, 2003, an assistant district attorney in Montgomery County presented an information in the trial court charging appellant with misdemeanor driving while intoxicated (DWI). The ...

Peavey v. State

... At the penalty stage of the trial, appellant pleaded "true" to the three prior felony convictions alleged for the enhancement of punishment, including: a felony driving while intoxicated (DWI) conviction in 2003 in the same district court; convictions for possession of a controlled ...

Brown v. State

... Brown was placed in custody and charged with DWI-Misdemeanor Repetition. ... 2000). B. Applicable Law. Under Texas law, a person commits DWI "if the person is intoxicated while operating a motor vehicle in a public place." Tex. Penal Code Ann. § 49.04 (Vernon 2008). ...