Providence Real Estate Lawyer, Rhode Island


James T. Marasco Lawyer

James T. Marasco

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

At The Law Offices of James T. Marasco, we can guide you on the road to a better future through personal injury, bankruptcy and Social Security Disabi... (more)

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800-766-0901

Steven Aaron Robinson Lawyer

Steven Aaron Robinson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Motor Vehicle, Real Estate

I have been a practicing attorney for more than the past 27 years, concentrating in Family Law, Personal Injury, And Probate. If your case is conteste... (more)

Ryanna Tyler Capalbo Lawyer

Ryanna Tyler Capalbo

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Collection, Criminal

Ryanna T. Capalbo is an Associate Attorney with Bilodeau Carden, LLC. Mrs. Capalbo has extensive legal work experience in various areas of the law, i... (more)

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CONTACT

800-859-2560

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Robert B. Jacquard

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jennifer A. Armstrong

Collection, Consumer Bankruptcy, Workout, Foreclosure
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Kevin M Hayes

Corporate, Business Organization, Housing & Urban Development, Land Use & Zoning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Keri Hague Beck

Business Organization, Commercial Real Estate, Credit & Debt, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Angelo R. Simone

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Personal Injury, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

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800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Providence Real Estate Lawyers and Providence Real Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Real Estate practice areas such as Timeshare, Construction, Eminent Domain, Foreclosure, Land Use & Zoning, Landlord-Tenant and Other Real Estate matters.

LEGAL TERMS

COMMERCIAL FRUSTRATION

An unforeseen and uncontrollable event that excuses a party to a contract from performing his or her duties under that contract. For example, a landlord can bre... (more...)
An unforeseen and uncontrollable event that excuses a party to a contract from performing his or her duties under that contract. For example, a landlord can break a lease if the property she agreed to rent accidentally burns down before the tenants move in.

LANDLORD

The owner of any real estate, such as a house, apartment building or land, that is leased or rented to another person, called the tenant.

EVICTION

Removal of a tenant from rental property by a law enforcement officer. First, the landlord must file and win an eviction lawsuit, also known as an 'unlawful det... (more...)
Removal of a tenant from rental property by a law enforcement officer. First, the landlord must file and win an eviction lawsuit, also known as an 'unlawful detainer.'

CONTRACT

A legally binding agreement involving two or more people or businesses (called parties) that sets forth what the parties will or will not do. Most contracts tha... (more...)
A legally binding agreement involving two or more people or businesses (called parties) that sets forth what the parties will or will not do. Most contracts that can be carried out within one year can be either oral or written. Major exceptions include contracts involving the ownership of real estate and commercial contracts for goods worth $500 or more, which must be in writing to be enforceable. (See statute of frauds.) A contract is formed when competent parties -- usually adults of sound mind or business entities -- mutually agree to provide each other some benefit (called consideration), such as a promise to pay money in exchange for a promise to deliver specified goods or services or the actual delivery of those goods and services. A contract normally requires one party to make a reasonably detailed offer to do something -- including, typically, the price, time for performance and other essential terms and conditions -- and the other to accept without significant change. For example, if I offer to sell you ten roses for $5 to be delivered next Thursday and you say 'It's a deal,' we've made a valid contract. On the other hand, if one party fails to offer something of benefit to the other, there is no contract. For example, if Maria promises to fix Josh's car, there is no contract unless Josh promises something in return for Maria's services.

UNCONSCIONABILITY

A seller's taking advantage of a buyer due to their unequal bargaining positions, perhaps because of the buyer's recent trauma, physical infirmity, ignorance, i... (more...)
A seller's taking advantage of a buyer due to their unequal bargaining positions, perhaps because of the buyer's recent trauma, physical infirmity, ignorance, inability to read or inability to understand the language. The unfairness must be so severe that it is shocking to the average person. It usually includes the absence of any meaningful choice on the part of the buyer and contract terms so one-sided that they unreasonably favor the seller. A contract will be terminated if the buyer can prove unconscionability.

NUISANCE

Something that interferes with the use of property by being irritating, offensive, obstructive or dangerous. Nuisances include a wide range of conditions, every... (more...)
Something that interferes with the use of property by being irritating, offensive, obstructive or dangerous. Nuisances include a wide range of conditions, everything from a chemical plant's noxious odors to a neighbor's dog barking. The former would be a 'public nuisance,' one affecting many people, while the other would be a 'private nuisance,' limited to making your life difficult, unless the dog was bothering others. Lawsuits may be brought to abate (remove or reduce) a nuisance. See quiet enjoyment, attractive nuisance.

VARIANCE

An exception to a zoning ordinance, usually granted by a local government. For example, if you own an oddly shaped lot that could not accommodate a home in acco... (more...)
An exception to a zoning ordinance, usually granted by a local government. For example, if you own an oddly shaped lot that could not accommodate a home in accordance with your city's setback requirement, you could apply at the appropriate office for a variance allowing you to build closer to a boundary line.

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR

A legal category of worker defined by the Internal Revenue Service. The key to the definition is that, unlike employees, independent contractors retain control ... (more...)
A legal category of worker defined by the Internal Revenue Service. The key to the definition is that, unlike employees, independent contractors retain control over how the work they are hired to do gets done; the person or company paying the independent contractor controls only the outcome--the product or service.

LEASE

An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an ... (more...)
An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an apartment or business property) or personal property (such as a car or a boat). A lease should cover basic issues such as when the lease will begin and end, the rent or other costs, how payments should be made, and any restrictions on the use of the property. The property owner is often called the 'lessor,' and the person using the property is called the 'lessee.'