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Raeford Child Support Lawyer, North Carolina


Christina E. Baker

Family Law, Estate Planning, Child Support, Wills, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aaron Lee Bell

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Business Organization, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jody S. Foyles

Adoption, Corporate, Child Support, Civil Rights, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregg M. Illikainen

Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Premises Liability, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Patricia A. Wilson Ferguson

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Adoption, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gary A. Morris

Government Agencies, Traffic, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Regina Roberts Sutherland

Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Meleisa Rush Lane

Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

800-923-0641

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LEGAL TERMS

CONFINEMENT IN PRISON

In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of ... (more...)
In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of years.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

New Hanover Child Support v. Rains

Pursuant to NC Gen.Stat. § 50-13.7(a) (2007), "[A]n order of a court of this State for support of a minor child may be modified or vacated at any time, upon motion in the cause and a showing of changed circumstances by either party...." Id. "Modification of a child support order ...

Mason v. Dwinnell

... acknowledges and agrees that their child's relationship with [Mason] should be protected and promoted to preserve the strong emotional ties that exist between them;" and (5) "the parties desire to make provisions regarding the support, custody and care of their child in the ...

In re MD

... awarded to her on 2 September 2005, Respondent-Father had "taken no other steps or made no other acts [sic] which would demonstrate any filial affection for the children, except to contact [Petitioner-Mother] after he was arrested for non[-]payment of child support in March ...