Sainte Genevieve Divorce Lawyer, Missouri


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

William G. Reeves

Child Support, Corporate, Contract, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jacquelyn Suzanne Gonz

Child Support, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jacquelyn Gonz

Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert David Huelskamp

Estate Planning, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Renee Anne Murphy

Juvenile Law, Traffic, Family Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Cira Renee Duffe

Bankruptcy, Family Law, Estate Planning, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Arthur Dominick Pistorio

Labor Law, Adoption, Corporate, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Kelli Marie Guilliams

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Family Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

James Ransford Joyce

Estate Planning, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Warlop v. Warlop

... During divorce proceedings, it was shown that the child was not Husband's natural child. Outside of the divorce proceedings, Husband and Wife signed a "Parenting Plan" allowing Husband to visit the child. Following the divorce ...

Smith v. Kintz

... Further, as adduced at the divorce trial, [Relator] is a savvy business man with no less than six businesses, five rental properties and a timeshare and four vehicles. Evidence adduced at the divorce trial displayed his extensive use of attorneys in his holdings and otherwise. . . . ...

In re Estate of Olsen

... husband. Prior to his death, Joseph Olsen (Husband) and Jessie Ann Olsen (Wife) separated and Husband filed a petition seeking a divorce. ... agreement"). Husband died intestate in a vehicular accident before the divorce became final. ...