Sandy Estate Lawyer, Utah

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Diana J Huntsman Lawyer

Diana J Huntsman

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Divorce & Family Law, Mediation, Divorce, Family Law, Estate

Diana has been a mediator for twelve years, since 2012. She has helped hundreds of couples resolve their divorce and custody conflicts through mediat... (more)

Michelle Swift

Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Civil Rights, Dispute Resolution
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Justin H. Riley

Real Estate, Estate, Business, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Gregory P. Hawkins

Estate, Trusts, Living Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Dean Smith

Litigation, Estate Planning, Non-profit, Franchising
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Kurt O Hawes

Employee Rights, Civil Rights, Estate Planning, International Tax, Non-profit
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Dennis M Astill

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Rustin Paul Diehl

Merger & Acquisition, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

J.Ed Christiansen

Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Military
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

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Peter A Klc

Real Estate, Business, Estate Planning, Adoption, Landlord-Tenant
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

INTESTATE

The condition of dying without a valid will. The probate court appoints an administrator to distribute the deceased person's property according to state law.

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

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