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Tennessee Divorce & Family Law Lawyer List


Pamela Williams Kelly Lawyer

Pamela Williams Kelly

VERIFIED
Memphis Divorce & Family Law Lawyer
Law office

PWK Law (aka The Law Offices of Pamela Williams Kelly) was created to help people. Behind every business…at every dinner table…in every culture…... (more)

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James Randall Krenis Lawyer

James Randall Krenis

VERIFIED
Jackson Divorce & Family Law Lawyer

Attorney James Krenis believes in being easy to reach and superiorly attentive to the needs of his clients. James navigates contractual and public rel... (more)

William L. Gribble Lawyer

William L. Gribble

VERIFIED
Maryville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer
We protect your interest!

Attorney William Gribble

At the Law Office of William Gribble, located in Maryville, Tennessee I work with clients throughout the Knox... (more)

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CONTACT

800-627-6390

Bill W. Pemerton Lawyer

Bill W. Pemerton

VERIFIED
Chattanooga Divorce & Family Law Lawyer

Bill Pemerton earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Tennessee Technological University in 2000 and was awarded his J.D. from the Cumberland Schoo... (more)

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800-929-6461

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Clay  White Lawyer

Clay White

VERIFIED
Knoxville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer

Clay is an associate attorney in the Angel Law Firm’s Knoxville, TN office. He is originally from Greenville, Mississippi, and holds a Bachelor of B... (more)

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800-955-6471

Reginald E Shelton Lawyer

Reginald E Shelton

VERIFIED
Memphis Divorce & Family Law Lawyer
Knowledgeable, Accessible, Friendly, and moderately priced. Please review my website and Facebook ad

By way of introduction, I am Attorney Reginald E. Shelton and I have over seven (7) years of legal experience representing clients in General Sessions... (more)

Jeff  Mueller Lawyer

Jeff Mueller

VERIFIED
Trenton Divorce & Family Law Lawyer

Jeff Mueller is a graduate of Southern Illinois University (B.A. in Economics 1984), Washington State University (M.A. in Economics 1990), and Univers... (more)

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800-597-8120

Joanna  McCracken Lawyer

Joanna McCracken

VERIFIED
Nashville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer

Joanna McCracken works primarily as a litigator focusing on domestic and family law matters, including divorce, child custody, spousal and child suppo... (more)

Jeffrey Dennis Johnson Lawyer

Jeffrey Dennis Johnson

VERIFIED
Johnson City Divorce & Family Law Lawyer
We're your friend when no one else is.

Jeffrey Johnson is a practicing attorney in the state of Tennessee. He graduated from Pepperdine University School of Law with his J.D. in 1982.

Jeremy Wayne Parham Lawyer

Jeremy Wayne Parham

VERIFIED
Manchester Divorce & Family Law Lawyer
General law practice focused on assisting clients with family law and criminal defense needs.

Hello and thank you for your interest in Parham Law Offices. We are a Middle Tennessee law firm focusing on litigation in the areas of family law/divo... (more)

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800-923-8791

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LEGAL TERMS

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.