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York Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Pennsylvania


Seamus Donohue Dubbs Lawyer

Seamus Donohue Dubbs

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Litigation, Landlord-Tenant

Seamus Dubbs is a practicing attorney in the state of Pennsylvania. He received his J.D. from Duquesne University School of Law in 2003. He currently ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-830-9310

Joseph A. Kalasnik Lawyer

Joseph A. Kalasnik

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Estate Planning, Consumer Bankruptcy, Personal Injury

Joseph A. "Jay" Kalasnik concentrates his practice in criminal defense, family law, vehicle and traffic law, consumer bankruptcy, and municipal law... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-838-6750

Andrea Eveler Stanley Lawyer

Andrea Eveler Stanley

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

Eveler & Eveler LLC is a family firm serving York County, Pennsylvania for over 50 years. The firm was started by our father in 1955. He has since re... (more)

Debra Rae Mehaffie Lawyer

Debra Rae Mehaffie

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Mrs. Mehaffie is passionate about helping others. She received a B.A. in Elementary Education from the Pennsylvania State University in 1997. She enjo... (more)

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Gregory S. Hazlett Lawyer

Gregory S. Hazlett

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute, Wills
FREE CONSULTATIONS

Gregory Hazlett is a practicing attorney in the state of Pennsylvania. He graduated from Widener University School of Law with his J.D. in 1993. He cu... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-750-5270

N. Christopher Menges

Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Tax, Child Custody, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Victor A. Neubaum

Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney, Adoption, Land Use & Zoning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gilbert G. Malone

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Municipal, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dann S. Johns

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura Susan Manifold

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collection, Commercial Leasing
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DIVORCE

The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers wit... (more...)
The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers with the court. These reasons are referred to as grounds for a divorce.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

QUALIFIED MEDICAL CHILD SUPPORT ORDER (QMSCO)

A court order that provides health benefit coverage for the child of the noncustodial parent under that parent's group health plan.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.