Allentown Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Pennsylvania


Bohdan J. Zelechiwsky Lawyer

Bohdan J. Zelechiwsky

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Motor Vehicle, Real Estate

Attorney Bohdan J. Zelechiwsky is a practicing attorney in the state of Pennsylvania. He graduated from Vermont Law School with his J.D. in 1976. He c... (more)

Stacy L. Morane Lawyer

Stacy L. Morane

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Divorce Without War, It Is Possible.

Born and raised in Allentown; as a native of the Lehigh Valley, Stacy is a staunch advocate for her clients. Since having been admitted to the Pennsyl... (more)

Joseph J. Piperato Lawyer

Joseph J. Piperato

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Real Estate
Bethlehem Criminal Lawyer

Joseph Piperato is a practicing Lawyer based out of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. His bar admission status is in good standing and has been practicing Law ... (more)

Richard Ellis Santee

Arbitration, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Bad Faith Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Joanne Kelhart

Municipal, Employment Discrimination, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel E. Cohen

Business Organization, Products Liability, Family Law, Pharmaceutical Product
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Keith D. Cacciatore

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas Lightner

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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William Paul Bried

Real Estate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Michael Brunnabend

Traffic, Transportation & Shipping, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

DIVORCE

The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers wit... (more...)
The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers with the court. These reasons are referred to as grounds for a divorce.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

CONSUMMATION

The actualization of a marriage. Sexual intercourse is required to 'consummate' a marriage. Failure to do so is grounds for divorce or annulment.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.