Blue Bell Family Law Lawyer, Pennsylvania

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Andrew D. Taylor Lawyer

Andrew D. Taylor

VERIFIED
Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Child Support
I limit my practice exclusively to family law includingdivorce, support and custody.

I practice family law in Montgomery, Chester, Bucks, Berks, Delaware and Philadelphia Counties. I also handle family law appeals for cases all ove... (more)

Lori K. Shemtob

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Catherine Marie Cardozo

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Catherine M. (Kate) Harper

Corporate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Richard A. Stanko

Civil Rights, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

James M. Jacquette

Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark E. Weand

Family Law, Municipal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric J. Cox

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew F. Fox

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Amy R. Stern

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

SPLIT CUSTODY

A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. ... (more...)
A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. This arrangement is generally disfavored by judges because they are reluctant to split up siblings.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

ZONING

The laws dividing cities into different areas according to use, from single-family residences to industrial plants. Zoning ordinances control the size, location... (more...)
The laws dividing cities into different areas according to use, from single-family residences to industrial plants. Zoning ordinances control the size, location, and use of buildings within these different areas.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Procito v. Unemployment Comp. Bd. of Review

... [10] The majority fails to consider the "best interests of the child" doctrine, which motivates and controls family law. If Claimant were to prove that she has provided care, shelter, nurture and affection to the children of her domestic ...

Staub v. Staub

... Father, as the "breadwinner" of the family, has been relatively uninvolved in the home school program by his choice, according to his testimony. ... Historically, we note that in 1682, the "Great Law" passed by the First General Assembly of Pennsylvania "included a provision for the ...

Yates v. Yates

... Id. ¶ 19 In appointing Attorney Famous, the trial court observed that Attorney Famous is "a highly respected Bucks County attorney whose practice is focused solely on Family law[.]" Trial Court Opinion, 3/7/08, at 9 n. 5. The trial court presided 542 over this custody dispute since ...