Chesterfield Estate Planning Lawyer, Missouri


Includes: Gift Taxation

Julia L. Gray Lawyer

Julia L. Gray

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Accident & Injury, Business, Mediation
General practice of law + Mediator of family, small business, and neighbor disputes.

Our office happily provides "extraordinary legal services to ordinary people." Many of our clients mistakenly believe that only the wealthy are able t... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-943-9030

Craig G. Kallen

Family Law, Child Support, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Brian G. Quinn

Veterans' Affairs, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Gregory F. Quinn

Criminal, Employment, Estate Planning, Personal Injury, Transactions
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Thomas A. Palumbo

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Stephen C. Banton

Estate Planning, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Brent L. Martin

Business Organization, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Nichole Y. Wren

Gift Taxation, Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Living Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rudy D. Beck

Elder Law, Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           

Vincent Ralph Krekeler

International Tax, Power of Attorney, Elder Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


TIPS

Easily find Chesterfield Estate Planning Lawyers and Chesterfield Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

INCOMPETENCE

The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at ... (more...)
The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at which the person is present and/or represented by an attorney. A finding of incompetence may lead to the appointment of a conservator to manage the person's affairs. Also known as 'incompetency.'

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Cramer v. Smoot

... Without seeking his permission, Smoot and Rice, Cramer's step-children, withdrew $58,000 from the senior citizen's savings account. Both were listed on the account for estate planning purposes only, and at no time had they contributed any money to the account. ...

WATERMANN v. Fitzpatrick

... a. Eleanor was unable to get out of the car she was in, to execute her Trust and other estate planning documents; ... a. Wallace and Bonita saw Eleanor every day; b. Bonita scheduled Eleanor's appointment with Mr. Zick, to discuss Eleanor's estate planning, and. ...

IN THE MATTER OF GENE WILD INSURANCE TRUST US BANK

... On July 10, 1990, Shirley Gene Wild ("Decedent") executed a number of estate-planning documents, including the Gene Wild Revocable Trust agreement, which created the Gene Wild Revocable Trust ("Revocable Trust"), and the Gene Wild Insurance Trust agreement, which ...