Chicago Child Custody Lawyer, Illinois

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Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Jonathan G. Anderson Lawyer

Jonathan G. Anderson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Custody & Visitation, Adoption, Family Law

Jonathan Anderson is the principal attorney and founder of Anderson & Associates, P.C. Mr. Anderson guided the growth of this family law firm from a o... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

312-345-9999

Tina  Abramovitch Lawyer

Tina Abramovitch

VERIFIED
Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Adoption
DEDICATED TO THE PRACTICE OF FAMILY LAW

Tina Abramovitch is a founding partner of Badesch∙Abramovitch, LLC. Tina received her Bachelor of Arts Degree from McGill University in Montreal... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-609-2870

Christopher David Wehrman Lawyer

Christopher David Wehrman

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Family Law, Mediation

Chris Wehrman represents clients in a variety of litigation matters involving family law issues including dissolution of marriage proceedings; custody... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-990-0160

Michael Andrew Otte Lawyer

Michael Andrew Otte

Elder Law, Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, International Tax

Michael A. Otte concentrates his practice on estate planning, trust administration, and contested and litigated estates and trusts. Additionally, Mich... (more)

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John E. Trepel Lawyer

John E. Trepel

VERIFIED
Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Paternity, Bankruptcy

John Trepel is a practicing attorney in Chicago, IL, who specializes in divorce & family law and bankruptcy matters. Mr. Trepel's office is conven... (more)

Maxine  Weiss Kunz Lawyer

Maxine Weiss Kunz

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody
Divorce Lawyer Evanston | Skokie Family Law Attorney | Illinois

Maxine Weiss Kunz is an attorney practicing 100% family law since 2005, including traditional litigation, adoptions, and collaborative law. She is cer... (more)

Theresa M. Malysa Lawyer

Theresa M. Malysa

VERIFIED
Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Alimony & Spousal Support, Family Law, Collaborative Law

The office of Theresa M. Malysa practices law in Orland, Illinois, Mokena, New Lenox, Lockport, Will and Cook Co. Our entire staff is dedicated to ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-916-7640

Joseph  Olszowka, Jr. Lawyer

Joseph Olszowka, Jr.

VERIFIED
Divorce, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Paternity, Adoption

The Law Office of Joseph A. Olszowka,Jr. provides legal services to residents of Dupage, Will, Cook, Kane and Lake Counties in Illinois., IL. The L... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-279-7890

Carrissa  Alvers Lawyer

Carrissa Alvers

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Family Law, Divorce

CARRISSA M. ALVERS is Of Counsel to Klein, Daday, Aretos & O’Donoghue, LLC. Ms. Alvers received her law degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1... (more)

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LEGAL TERMS

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Sophia GL

... Judge Love did not respond. On September 13, 2006, Andrew filed a contest to registration of the Indiana child custody determination. ... It's anticipated under the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Act that Judges are supposed to talk to one another. ...

In re Custody of MCC

... 518, 544 NE2d 1293. It is clear, however, that physical custody is not determined based on physical possession of the child at time the custody petition is filed. ... 690, 491 NE2d 1150 (1986) (standing "should not turn on" who had the child when the custody petition was filed). ...

Smith v. Freeman

... 1072 In Sorenson, a petition for dissolution of marriage was at issue, including child custody. ... 640, 487 NE2d 84. Moreover, since the circuit court retains jurisdiction during the child's minority, this serves as an added protection in child custody cases. ...