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Corpus Christi Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Texas


Alex  Hernandez Lawyer

Alex Hernandez

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Accident & Injury, Business, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Alex R. Hernandez, Jr. is an acclaimed trial attorney

Alex R. Hernandez, Jr. is an acclaimed trial attorney who has been practicing law for two decades. He has represented a very large number of victims o... (more)

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CONTACT

800-789-4570

Allan Leslie Potter Lawyer

Allan Leslie Potter

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy, Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Aviation, Lawsuit

Our firm is dedicated to providing quality legal services to our clients. We will consult with our clients so they understand the law and advise on s... (more)

Jeanne O. Chastain Lawyer

Jeanne O. Chastain

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law

Jeanne Chastain is a practicing lawyer in the state of Texas. She received her J.D. from University of Georgia School of Law in 1976.

Jorge C. Rangel

Corporate, Communication & Media Law, Employment, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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James W. Wray

Collaborative Law, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Guy Williams

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Family Law, Traffic, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

William A. Thau

Adoption, Dispute Resolution, Bankruptcy, Business Organization, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory Glen Spivey

Adoption, Family Law, Divorce, Wills & Probate, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kelly L Koch

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lindsay M. Browne

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (TRO)

An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court ... (more...)
An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court holds a second hearing where the other side can tell his story and the court can decide whether to make the TRO permanent by issuing an injunction. Although a TRO will often not stop an enraged spouse from acting violently, the police are more willing to intervene if the abused spouse has a TRO.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.