Denver Family Law Lawyer, Colorado


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

John Loren Eckelberry Lawyer

John Loren Eckelberry

VERIFIED
Family Law, Bankruptcy, Divorce, Child Custody, Collection
Providing personal and financial fresh starts for almost 20 years!

John has been practicing law in Colorado since 1998. He is the founding member of Eckelberry Law Firm, established in 2006, in charge of the family l... (more)

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CONTACT

303-434-1131

Jim  Margulis Lawyer

Jim Margulis

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody, Divorce
Firepower Inside And Outside of The Courtroom.

Feldmann Nagel, LLC provides experienced, client-focused representation to individuals and families looking to navigate a variety of divorce and famil... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-866-4851

Adam William Galvan Moore Lawyer

Adam William Galvan Moore

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Welcome to the law firm of Adam W.G. Moore. I am a solo practitioner providing strong, solid legal representation in all Colorado divorce and family l... (more)

Leonard R. Higdon Lawyer

Leonard R. Higdon

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal
We Will Help You Evaluate Options We Will Protect Your Interests

Leonard Higdon has lived in Colorado since 1985. Raised in Hawaii, he moved to Colorado to attend Fort Lewis College in Durango, where he received his... (more)

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Michael Patrick Hinds Lawyer

Michael Patrick Hinds

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody

A Colorado native, Mike Hinds attended Eckerd College in Saint Petersburg, Florida, majoring in International Business and Modern Languages. Before at... (more)

Lawrence T Zehfuss Lawyer

Lawrence T Zehfuss

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Adoption

Lawrence “Larry” Zehfuss has over 25 years of legal experience while practicing primarily in the area of family law. Mr. Zehfuss was born in Pitts... (more)

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CONTACT

800-991-6260

Diana L. Powell Lawyer

Diana L. Powell

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Business, Merger & Acquisition

Diana focuses her practice on high asset, high conflict divorce representation. Previously, Diana acted as lead counsel to buyers or sellers in over 1... (more)

Rodger C. Daley

Family Law, Constitutional Law, Wrongful Death, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Denver Family Law Lawyers and Denver Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

DEPENDENTS BENEFITS

A type of Social Security benefit available to spouses and minor or disabled children of retired or disabled workers who qualify for either retirement or disabi... (more...)
A type of Social Security benefit available to spouses and minor or disabled children of retired or disabled workers who qualify for either retirement or disability benefits under the program's rigorous qualification guidelines.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

SPLIT CUSTODY

A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. ... (more...)
A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. This arrangement is generally disfavored by judges because they are reluctant to split up siblings.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

McCallum Family LLC v. Winger

... Plaintiff, McCallum Family, LLC (McCallum), appeals the judgment, entered after a trial to the court, in favor of defendants, Marc Winger and Karen Winger. ... We agree. The proper burden of proof is a question of law which we review de novo. Microsemi Corp. ...

American Family Mut. Ins. Co. v. DeWitt

... claims in equity. Turning to the rights obtained by American Family through that subrogation, negligence is a cause of action at law, whether examining the historical roots of the concept or the remedies sought. As such, the court ...

Lewis v. Lewis

... The majority comes up with its "mutual purpose of the parties" cause of action by "[b]orrowing from ... diverse jurisprudence," including trust and family law. Maj. op. at 1143. Yet it ignores precedent precisely on point in the field of unjust enrichment. ...