Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Denver Estate Lawyer, Colorado

Sponsored Law Firm


Lori  Hulbert Lawyer

Lori Hulbert

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Tax, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law

Lori Hulbert successfully represents individual and corporate clients in business succession planning, real estate transactions, and related disputes.... (more)

Jim (Jed) Ed Franklin Lawyer

Jim (Jed) Ed Franklin

VERIFIED
Oil & Gas, Business Organization, Contract, Merger & Acquisition, Wills & Probate
Offers diversity of experience and dedication to clientneeds and goals.

Jim Ed (Jed) Franklin is a Partner at Schroeder & Griffith, LLP in Denver, Colorado. Mr. Franklin has experience in transactional and corporate law sp... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-914-3611

Emilie  Lorden Lawyer

Emilie Lorden

VERIFIED
Employment, Business, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate

Emilie grew up in northern Massachusetts where she spent most of her time outside, running track, and with family and friends. After she graduated hig... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-798-8220

Marco  Chayet Lawyer

Marco Chayet

VERIFIED
Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Medicare & Medicaid

During law school, Mr. Chayet's grandmother, Letty Milstein, was the principle party in one of the most controversial and public elder law cases in th... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-295-7850

Ronnie  Fischer Lawyer

Ronnie Fischer

VERIFIED
General Practice
I provide a broad range of legal services to both individuals and businesses.

Ronnie was born and raised in New York. He has always had a passion for the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Throughout high school, college, and law school ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-823-9280

Jim Ed Franklin Lawyer

Jim Ed Franklin

VERIFIED
Oil & Gas, Business Organization, Contract, Merger & Acquisition, Wills & Probate
Offers diversity of experience and dedication to clientneeds and goals.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Erika Alese Gebhardt Lawyer

Erika Alese Gebhardt

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate

Erika Gebhardt practices exclusively family law and estate planning. Erika began her career in family law when she worked as an extern at the firm dur... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-715-8210

Rose Mary Zapor Lawyer

Rose Mary Zapor

VERIFIED
Elder Law, Medicare & Medicaid, Wills & Probate, Child Custody, Divorce

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire

Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference.
I... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-783-0501

Robert D Kelly Lawyer

Robert D Kelly

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Traffic

Robert Kelly is an accomplished lawyer, with over 42 years of legal experience in criminal and family law matters. He has his own firm based out of Wh... (more)

James  LeSuer Lawyer

James LeSuer

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute

James has been in the business of law for 23 years. He handled the litigation department for a legal firm for over 8 years before starting his priva... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-923-0641

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.


TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Denver Estate Lawyers and Denver Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

ABSTRACT OF TRUST

A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract... (more...)
A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract of trust to a financial organization or other institution to prove that you have established a valid living trust, without revealing specifics that you want to keep private. In some states, this document is called a 'certification of trust.'

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.