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Todd  Scardina Lawyer

Todd Scardina

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Business

For over a decade, Todd Scardina has provided unparalleled legal representation to Colorado families, businesses, and individuals through tenacious, d... (more)

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720-420-9068

Eric Brian Liebman Lawyer

Eric Brian Liebman

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Construction, Litigation, Securities, Business

Eric Liebman has represented the business and litigation interests of public and private companies and individuals for fifteen years. He has substant... (more)

Michael William Gross Lawyer

Michael William Gross

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Motor Vehicle, Real Estate, Federal Appellate Practice

Attorney Gross is a practicing lawyer in the state of Colorado.

Ronnie  Fischer Lawyer

Ronnie Fischer

VERIFIED
Business, Intellectual Property, Estate, Toxic Mold & Tort, Real Estate
I provide a broad range of legal services to both individuals and businesses.

Ronnie was born and raised in New York. He has always had a passion for the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Throughout high school, college, and law school ... (more)

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800-823-9280

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Wayne  Vaden Lawyer

Wayne Vaden

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate

Wayne Vaden is a practicing lawyer in the state of Colorado. Mr. Vaden received his J.D. from Arizona State University in 1991.

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CONTACT

800-897-2640

James Vernon Pearson Lawyer

James Vernon Pearson

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Employment
Serious representation for when it matters the most. Call me now!

Mr. Pearson has 30 years experience in business law, business management and consulting. He has received a Martindale-Hubbell top AV@ rating for attor... (more)

David A Bailey

Environmental Law, Litigation, Minerals & Mining, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark E. Henze

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jesse Howard Witt

Housing & Construction Defects, Construction, Corporate, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jeffrey N. Herren

Commercial Real Estate, Conveyancing, Criminal, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CONSTRUCTIVE EVICTION

When a landlord provides housing that is so substandard that a landlord has legally evicted the tenant. For example, if the landlord refuses to provide heat or ... (more...)
When a landlord provides housing that is so substandard that a landlord has legally evicted the tenant. For example, if the landlord refuses to provide heat or water or refuses to clean up an environmental health hazard, the tenant has the right to move out and stop paying rent, without incurring legal liability for breaking the lease.

HOLD HARMLESS

In a contract, a promise by one party not to hold the other party responsible if the other party carries out the contract in a way that causes damage to the fir... (more...)
In a contract, a promise by one party not to hold the other party responsible if the other party carries out the contract in a way that causes damage to the first party. For example, many leases include a hold harmless clause in which the tenant agrees not to sue the landlord if the tenant is injured due to the landlord's failure to maintain the premises. In most states, these clauses are illegal in residential tenancies, but may be upheld in commercial settings.

NULLA BONA

Latin for 'no goods.' This is what the sheriff writes when she can find no property to seize in order to pay off a court judgment.

NONCOMPETITION AGREEMENT

An agreement, generally included in an employment contract or a contract for the sale of a business, where one party agrees not to compete with the other party ... (more...)
An agreement, generally included in an employment contract or a contract for the sale of a business, where one party agrees not to compete with the other party for a specific period of time and within a particular area. Salespeople, for example, often sign noncompetition agreements that prevent them from using the contacts gained by one employer to benefit another employer. Or a salesperson may sign what is known as a 'noncompete,' agreeing not to sell within a particular area, or even work in the same type of business. In some states, such as California, courts view noncompetition agreements with disfavor and will not enforce them unless the restrictions are very narrow. In other states, courts routinely uphold them.

EASEMENT

A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as... (more...)
A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as a right of way. In addition, property owners commonly grant easements for the placement of utility poles, utility trenches, water lines or sewer lines. The owner of property that is subject to an easement is said to be 'burdened' with the easement, because he or she is not allowed to interfere with its use. For example, if the deed to John's property permits Sue to travel across John's main road to reach her own home, John cannot do anything to block the road. On the other hand, Sue cannot do anything that exceeds the scope of her easement, such as widening the roadway.

UNCLEAN HANDS

A legal doctrine that prevents a plaintiff who has acted unethically in relation to a lawsuit from winning the suit or from recovering as much money as she woul... (more...)
A legal doctrine that prevents a plaintiff who has acted unethically in relation to a lawsuit from winning the suit or from recovering as much money as she would have if she had behaved honorably. For example, if a contractor is suing a homeowner to recover the price of work he did on the home, his failure to perform the work as specified would leave him with unclean hands.

INTANGIBLE PROPERTY

Personal property that has no physical existence, such as stocks, bonds, bank notes, trade secrets, patents, copyrights and trademarks. Such 'untouchable' items... (more...)
Personal property that has no physical existence, such as stocks, bonds, bank notes, trade secrets, patents, copyrights and trademarks. Such 'untouchable' items may be represented by a certificate or license that fixes or approximates the value, but others (such as the goodwill or reputation of a business) are not easily valued or embodied in any instrument. Compare tangible property.

STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS

The legally prescribed time limit in which a lawsuit must be filed. Statutes of limitation differ depending on the type of legal claim, and often the state. For... (more...)
The legally prescribed time limit in which a lawsuit must be filed. Statutes of limitation differ depending on the type of legal claim, and often the state. For example, many states require that a personal injury lawsuit be filed within one year from the date of injury -- or in some instances, from the date when it should reasonably have been discovered -- but some allow two years. Similarly, claims based on a written contract must be filed in court within four years from the date the contract was broken in some states and five years in others. Statute of limitations rules apply to cases filed in all courts, including federal court.

LIFE TENANT

One who has a life estate in real property.