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Durham Trusts Lawyer, North Carolina


Robert L. Morton

Business Organization, Contract, Wills & Probate, Bankruptcy, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mary Ann Dalton

Wills & Probate, Government Agencies, Wills, Trusts, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

William J Wickward, Jr.

Social Security -- Disability, Special Education, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Veterans' Affairs
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years
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Mark O. Costley

Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nichole Monique Hatcher

Employee Rights, Litigation, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Gregory Herman-Giddens

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Ralph Lee Mccaughan

International Tax, Trusts, Licensing
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rupe Gill

Power of Attorney, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Costley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

SUMMARY PROBATE

A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are ... (more...)
A relatively simple probate proceeding available for 'small estates,' as that term is defined by state law. Every state's definition is different, and many are complicated, but a few examples include estates worth up to $100,000 in California; New York estates where property, excluding real estate and amounts that must be set aside for surviving family members, is worth $20,000 or less; and Texas estates where the value of property doesn't exceed what is needed to pay a family allowance and certain creditors.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

TITLE COMPANY

A company that issues title insurance.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Carcano v. JBSS, LLC

... Constructive trusts ordinarily arise from actual or constructive fraud and usually involve the "`breach of a confidential relationship.'" Patterson v. Strickland, 133 NCApp. ... Trusts created by operation of law are classified into resulting trusts and constructive trusts. ...

Livesay v. Carolina First Bank

... NC Gen.Stat. § 36C-5-505(a)(3) (2007). The section was enacted in 2005, became effective on 1 January 2006, and applies to. (i) all trusts created before, on, or after that date; (ii) all judicial proceedings concerning trusts commenced on or after that date; and (iii) judicial ...

In re Ernst & Young, LLP

... Carolina. In 1996, with the assistance of Ernst & Young, Wal-Mart underwent corporate restructuring to implement these tax shelters and placed substantially all of its real estate interests in real estate investment trusts ("REITs"). ...