Fairfax Felony Lawyer, Virginia

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Michael Andrew Robinson Lawyer

Michael Andrew Robinson

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic

Recognized by Northern Virginia Magazine as a top Traffic & DWI Criminal Attorney, Robinson Law, PLLC is committed to delivering the best Criminal Def... (more)

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Alex  Gordon Lawyer

Alex Gordon

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Traffic, Felony
Defense of DUI and criminal cases in Fairfax and PrinceWilliam County

We know that all people make mistakes. We look at our job as to try to help our clients minimize the impact of these errors upon there lives. Alex... (more)

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800-895-4831

Mary Margret Nerino Lawyer

Mary Margret Nerino

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Mary Nerino is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia who handles criminal cases. She has tried cases in assault, drug charges, domestic viol... (more)

James M Johnson Lawyer

James M Johnson

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Accident & Injury, DUI-DWI, Estate, Felony, Traffic
Protecting Our Clients for Life

When you're in need of legal advice or representation, it's important to find the right attorney. Choosing the right law office to represent you makes... (more)

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800-836-6721

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Steve  Duckett Lawyer

Steve Duckett

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor

Steve Duckett is a lawyer in the state of Virginia who handles criminal cases. He has tried cases involving assault, drug crimes, DUI, gun charges,... (more)

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703-680-6969

Karin Riley Porter Lawyer

Karin Riley Porter

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Federal

Karin Porter is a practicing lawyer in Virginia who focuses on criminal cases. Ms. Porter has previously served as an Assistant Commonwealth's Attorne... (more)

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703-291-3757

Thaddeus  Furlong Lawyer

Thaddeus Furlong

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Felony, Misdemeanor
DUI Traffic Criminal Lawyer Stafford Spotsylvania Fairfax

***Aggressive former police now fight for you! FREE CONSULT (540) 402-1600 or (703) 988-1010. Serving all Virginia DUI Traffic Criminal Lawyers with o... (more)

Bradley L. Buster

Criminal, Felony, Civil & Human Rights, Traffic
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Kyle Mars Courtnall

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Freedom of Information
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Matthew S. Kensky

Criminal, Felony, Grand Jury Proceedings, Juvenile Law
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LEGAL TERMS

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Coleman v. Com.

... KELSEY, Judge. On appeal, Armand Monet Coleman challenges the sufficiency of the evidence underlying his conviction for felony eluding in violation of Code § 46.2-817(B). We find the evidence sufficient and affirm Coleman's conviction. I. ...

Waller v. Com.

... OPINION BY Senior Justice HARRY L. CARRICO. In a bench trial held in the Circuit Court of Pittsylvania County, the defendant, James Lester Waller, was convicted of the possession of a firearm after having been convicted of a violent felony. ...

Ferguson v. Com.

... Appellant also challenges the sufficiency of the evidence to convict him of the felony child neglect charge. A panel ... conviction. Legette, 33 Va.App. 221, 532 SE2d 353. B. THE FELONY CHILD NEGLECT CHARGE. Appellant ...