Fairfax Criminal Lawyer, Virginia

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Jad N Sarsour Lawyer

Jad N Sarsour

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Bernard F. Crane Lawyer

Bernard F. Crane

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Traffic, Business & Trade, DUI-DWI

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Scott R. Sexauer Lawyer

Scott R. Sexauer

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Michael Andrew Robinson Lawyer

Michael Andrew Robinson

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic

Recognized by Northern Virginia Magazine as a top Traffic & DWI Criminal Attorney, Robinson Law, PLLC is committed to delivering the best Criminal Def... (more)

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Alex  Gordon Lawyer

Alex Gordon

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Traffic, Felony
Defense of DUI and criminal cases in Fairfax and PrinceWilliam County

We know that all people make mistakes. We look at our job as to try to help our clients minimize the impact of these errors upon there lives. Alex... (more)

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Richard Owen Bolger Lawyer

Richard Owen Bolger

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25 Years Of Experience Serving The Fairfax County And The Washington DC Region.

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Thomas  Soldan Lawyer

Thomas Soldan

DUI-DWI, Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury, Criminal

Thomas Soldan is a lawyer practicing in Virginia who handles criminal cases. He has tried cases involving DUI, assault, appeals, domestic violen... (more)

Mary Margret Nerino Lawyer

Mary Margret Nerino

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Mary Nerino is a practicing lawyer in the state of Virginia who handles criminal cases. She has tried cases in assault, drug charges, domestic viol... (more)

Salih Coujoe Alexander Lawyer

Salih Coujoe Alexander

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Richard Martin Reed Lawyer

Richard Martin Reed

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Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Defect and Lemon Law
Lawyers in Manassas, Virginia

Prior to joining The Reed Law Firm, Mr. Reed graduated near the top of his class at the Pennsylvania State University Dickinson School of Law. During ... (more)

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LEGAL TERMS

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

CRIMINAL CASE

A lawsuit brought by a prosecutor employed by the federal, state or local government that charges a person with the commission of a crime.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Magruder v. Com.

... Because the procedure provided in Code § 19.2-187.1 adequately protects a criminal defendant's rights under the Confrontation Clause and because the defendants in these appeals failed to utilize that procedure, we conclude that they waived the challenges under the ...

McCain v. Com.

... 335, 340, 288 SE2d 475, 478 (1982). Under well-settled principles of law, police officers may stop a person for the purpose of investigating possible criminal behavior even though no probable cause exists for an arrest. Terry, 392 US at 22, 88 S.Ct. 1868. ...

McMorris v. Com.

... This was all contemporaneous. Therefore[,] the robbery statute applies." In refusing McMorris' petition for appeal, the Court of Appeals concluded that the evidence established that McMorris shared the criminal intent of those who did steal Ottey's telephone and other items. ...