Fresno DUI-DWI Lawyer, California


Kojo Howard Moore Lawyer

Kojo Howard Moore

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Accident & Injury
AGGRESSIVE AND CARING LAWYER WHO FIGHTS HARD FOR HIS CLIENTS

Kojo Howard Moore a lawyer specialized in criminal defense and lives in Fresno. Kojo is a talented and tenacious advocate for his clients. He's a tria... (more)

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800-732-1751

Dennette  Glenn-Boeve Lawyer

Dennette Glenn-Boeve

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI

Central Valleys' most dedicated DUI and DMV lawyer. I will put on the gloves and fight for you. This charge does not have to ruin your life.

William Andrew Parry Lawyer

William Andrew Parry

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
Bad things happen to good people. I will fight for you.Never walk into court alone. FREE Consult.

Since 1999 William Parry has been fighting for his clients and achieving dismissals & the best results through hard work & attention to detail. He ser... (more)

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800-973-5221

John Patrick Ryan Lawyer

John Patrick Ryan

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony
Central Valley Solo Practice

My practice is centered on defending clients against criminal charges, protecting their interests in divorce and other family law cases, and represent... (more)

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Brian Christopher Andritch

Federal, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Martin Malkasian

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey A. Tenenbaum

White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Curtis Sok

Deportation, Immigration, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Harry M. Drandell

Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Gerald Saul Schwab

Accident & Injury, Products Liability, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Easily find Fresno DUI-DWI Lawyers and Fresno DUI-DWI Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. McNeal

... liquor" in violation of the generic DUI law. (Id., 772 A.2d at pp. 1088, 1091.) The Vermont Supreme Court agreed. (Id. at p. 1091.) The court observed that "any evidence raising a doubt as to [the] defendant's condition, which is the ultimate question in a generic DWI prosecution . ...

People v. Landon

... OPINION. LAMBDEN, J.—. On August 14, 2008, defendant pleaded guilty to driving under the influence (DUI) with a blood-alcohol level greater than 0.08 percent (Veh. Code, § 23152, subd. (b)); she admitted four prior DUI 1099 convictions. ...

People v. Patel

... In exchange for a grant of probation, defendant Javid Patel entered negotiated pleas of no contest to alternative felony counts of "generic" and "per se" [1] negligent driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) that resulted in bodily injury to another, and a misdemeanor count of ...