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Carey Leanne Haydon Lawyer

Carey Leanne Haydon

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Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Real Estate

Carey Haydon is a Fresno Attorney with Borton Petrini, LLP. Carey graduated from National University with a Bachelor credits in Psychology, Criminolog... (more)

Lenden Franklin Webb Lawyer

Lenden Franklin Webb

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Lawsuit & Dispute, Business, Employment, Intellectual Property, Real Estate

Lenden F. Webb is an experienced litigator and trial attorney with over 57 Jury trials, Bench trials and Arbitrations in 14 California counties spanni... (more)

George Joseph Vasquez Lawyer

George Joseph Vasquez

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Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Business

George J. Vasquez is the owner of the practice and is always personally available for his clients. As a Fresno native, he is closely connected to the ... (more)

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Brian Nicholas Folland Lawyer

Brian Nicholas Folland

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Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Accident & Injury, Business, Personal Injury

Legal worries can feel overwhelming to deal with, but you do have the right to ask for the representation of a local Clovis, CA, lawyer. Brian Folland... (more)

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Kathleen P. Clack

Bad Faith Insurance, Government Agencies, Construction, Agriculture
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D. Zackary Smith

Construction, Estate Planning, Litigation, Wills & Probate
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John L. Rozier

Premises Liability, Personal Injury, Car Accident, Animal Bite
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James L. Miller

Landlord-Tenant, Divorce & Family Law, Slip & Fall Accident, Personal Injury
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Jeffrey M. Reid

General Practice
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Scott Daniel Laird

Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Partnerships, Agriculture
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LEGAL TERMS

EASEMENT

A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as... (more...)
A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as a right of way. In addition, property owners commonly grant easements for the placement of utility poles, utility trenches, water lines or sewer lines. The owner of property that is subject to an easement is said to be 'burdened' with the easement, because he or she is not allowed to interfere with its use. For example, if the deed to John's property permits Sue to travel across John's main road to reach her own home, John cannot do anything to block the road. On the other hand, Sue cannot do anything that exceeds the scope of her easement, such as widening the roadway.

ASYLUM

A legal status granted to an individual who is in the United States and fears political persecution if he or she is forced to return to their home country.

NONCOMPETITION AGREEMENT

An agreement, generally included in an employment contract or a contract for the sale of a business, where one party agrees not to compete with the other party ... (more...)
An agreement, generally included in an employment contract or a contract for the sale of a business, where one party agrees not to compete with the other party for a specific period of time and within a particular area. Salespeople, for example, often sign noncompetition agreements that prevent them from using the contacts gained by one employer to benefit another employer. Or a salesperson may sign what is known as a 'noncompete,' agreeing not to sell within a particular area, or even work in the same type of business. In some states, such as California, courts view noncompetition agreements with disfavor and will not enforce them unless the restrictions are very narrow. In other states, courts routinely uphold them.

COVENANT

A restriction on the use of real estate that governs its use, such as a requirement that the property will be used only for residential purposes. Covenants are ... (more...)
A restriction on the use of real estate that governs its use, such as a requirement that the property will be used only for residential purposes. Covenants are found in deeds or in documents that bind everyone who owns land in a particular development. See covenants, conditions and restrictions.

HEIR

One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, ... (more...)
One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, modern usage includes anyone who receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

AUTHOR

In terms of copyright protection, either the person who creates the work, the person or business that pays another to create the work in an employment context o... (more...)
In terms of copyright protection, either the person who creates the work, the person or business that pays another to create the work in an employment context or the person or business that commissions the work under a valid work for hire contract. For example, a songwriter may write a song, but if he is employed by a company to do so, the company is the author of that song for copyright purposes.

MARITAL DEDUCTION

A deduction allowed by the federal estate tax laws for all property passed to a surviving spouse who is a U.S. citizen. This deduction (which really functions a... (more...)
A deduction allowed by the federal estate tax laws for all property passed to a surviving spouse who is a U.S. citizen. This deduction (which really functions as an exemption) allows anyone, even a billionaire, to pass his or her entire estate to a surviving spouse without any tax at all.

EXECUTRIX

An old-fashioned term for a female executor--the person named in a will to handle the distribution of the deceased person's property. Now, whether male or femal... (more...)
An old-fashioned term for a female executor--the person named in a will to handle the distribution of the deceased person's property. Now, whether male or female, this person is called either the executor or the personal representative.

EMINENT DOMAIN

The power of the federal or state government to take private property for a public purpose, even if the property owner objects. The Fifth Amendment to the Unite... (more...)
The power of the federal or state government to take private property for a public purpose, even if the property owner objects. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows the government to take private property if the taking is for a public use and the owner is 'justly compensated' (usually, paid fair market value) for his or her loss. A public use is virtually anything that is sanctioned by a federal or state legislative body, but such uses may include roads, parks, reservoirs, schools, hospitals or other public buildings. Sometimes called condemnation, taking or expropriation.