Independence Family Law Lawyer, Missouri

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

James R. Piedimonte Lawyer

James R. Piedimonte

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Paternity, Child Custody, Child Support

James Piedimonte is one of the most experienced family law attorneys in Jackson County with over 35 years experience in child custody and divorce lit... (more)

Anne Virginia Kiske Lawyer

Anne Virginia Kiske

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Estate
We offer services in family law, divorce, child custody, probate, estate planning and traffic

At the Kiske Law Office, LLC, I am responsible for child custody cases, child abuse cases, divorces, paternities, guardianships, and traffic matters, ... (more)

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800-895-7490

David P Kimminau

Farms, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

R. Scott Richart

Other, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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John W. Dennis

Farms, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael S.J. Albano

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ted Kapke

Business Organization, Family Law, Eminent Domain, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Robert D Murphy

Business Organization, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lisa M. Drummond

Family Law, Wills, Traffic, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tiffany B. Klosener

Civil Rights, Employment, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson v. McCullough

... Specifically, counsel asked, "Now not including family law, has anyone ever been a plaintiff or a defendant in a lawsuit before?" Although numerous members of the panel responded affirmatively, venire member Mims did not 555 respond to the question and eventually was ...

Teets v. American Family Mut. Ins. Co.

... b. Employment At Will Doctrine. American Family also argues the Agreement is terminable at will as a matter of law based on Missouri's at-will doctrine. ... Id. American Family presents no evidence or law indicating 470 otherwise. Point five is therefore denied. III. ...

DR Sherry Const. v. American Family Mut.

... policy period. Although the jury improperly was called to determine the legal issue of coverage, American Family was not prejudiced because, as a matter of law, the policy covers the type of claim made by Sherry in this case. ...