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Mitzi J. Alspaugh Lawyer

Mitzi J. Alspaugh

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Divorce & Family Law, Power of Attorney, Traffic, Wills & Probate, Child Custody

Mitzi Alspaugh is a practicing lawyer in the state of Missouri specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Ms. Alspaugh received her J.D. from the Washburn ... (more)

Anne Virginia Kiske Lawyer

Anne Virginia Kiske

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Estate
We offer services in family law, divorce, child custody, probate, estate planning and traffic

At the Kiske Law Office, LLC, I am responsible for child custody cases, child abuse cases, divorces, paternities, guardianships, and traffic matters, ... (more)

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Edmond J McElligott

Government, Estate Planning, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert H. Martin

Estate Planning, Criminal, Corporate, Banking & Finance
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Buford L. Farrington

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
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Paul E. Evans

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Mass Torts
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Steven C. Krueger

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Contract, Business Organization
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Scott R. Manuel

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Personal Injury
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Brian Timothy Meyers

Estate Planning, Wrongful Termination, Sexual Harassment, Personal Injury
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Robert D Murphy

Business Organization, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Independence Estate Lawyers and Independence Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

DEATH TAXES

Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who... (more...)
Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who inherit property.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

DISCHARGE (OF PROBATE ADMINISTRATOR)

A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties hav... (more...)
A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties have been completed but may happen sooner if the executor or administrator wishes to withdraw or is dismissed.

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

UNIFORM TRANSFER-ON-DEATH SECURITY ACT

A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using... (more...)
A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using a simple form that names a person to receive the property after the owner's death. Every state but Texas has adopted the statute.