Kansas City Estate Lawyer, Kansas


Michael P. Jahn Lawyer

Michael P. Jahn

VERIFIED
Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Social Security, Disability

Michael P. Jahn is a practicing lawyer in the state of Kansas who handles Estate matters.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

913-388-0328

Robert R. Titus Lawyer

Robert R. Titus

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Accident & Injury, Business, Credit & Debt, Estate

Henry David Thoreau said it best by stating, “the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation, and go to the grave with the song still in them.” R... (more)

Kenneth J. Geniuk

Consumer Protection, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stacey L. Janssen

Social Security -- Disability, Trusts, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel L. Smith

Social Security -- Disability, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael A. Hodgson

Class Action, Wills & Probate, Construction, Housing & Construction Defects
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Carl C. Radom

Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Non-profit, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  51 Years

Kathryn P Barnett

Power of Attorney, Estate Administration, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Colin Nacy Gotham

Tax, Estate, Business, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Stephanie Marie Smith

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages from all messaging and voice technologies including Email, Text, Phone, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Kansas City Estate Lawyers and Kansas City Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

TRUSTEE

The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income ... (more...)
The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income or principal as directed in the trust document. With a simple probate-avoidance living trust, the person who creates the trust is also the trustee.

LIFE BENEFICIARY

A person who receives benefits, under a trust or by will, for his or her lifetime. For an example, see AB trust.

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY

1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisf... (more...)
1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisfied. For example, if Fred is entitled to take property under a will only if he's married at the time of the will maker's death, Fred is a contingent beneficiary. Similarly, if Ellen is named to receive a house only in the event her mother, who has been named to live in the house, moves out of it, Ellen is a contingent beneficiary.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

WARRANTY DEED

A seldom-used type of deed that contains express assurances about the legal validity of the title being transferred.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).