Little Rock Misdemeanor Lawyer, Arkansas

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Valerie Lynne Goudie Lawyer

Valerie Lynne Goudie

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate, Civil & Human Rights

Valerie Palmedo-Goudie graduated from Auburn University in 1986 where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree. She graduated from Washington and Lee Scho... (more)

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Matthew Porter McKay Lawyer

Matthew Porter McKay

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Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor
I defend the accused, innocent, or guilty. I handle felony and misdemeanor cases.

Like many of my clients, I was born and raised in Arkansas by a single mother. I went to high school, college and law school in Little Rock. While in ... (more)

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Judson Candler Kidd Lawyer

Judson Candler Kidd

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Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

I was exposed to law at an early age as my grandfather and father were trial lawyers, grandmother was a court reporter and my uncle was a US Marshall.... (more)

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Lisa Gail Douglas

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Accident & Injury, Health Care, Social Security, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Focus of practice is injury, accidents and social security disability.

Talk to a Nurse/Attorney. Voted Best Attorney 4 consecutive years in the Stephens Media NLR Times Poll. Lisa Douglas has been licensed as a Register... (more)

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Robert Alston Newcomb

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment

Mr. Newcomb proudly represents clients in need of Criminal and Employment matters.

David W. Kamps

Personal Injury, Criminal, Litigation
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Laura Robertson

Farms, Child Support, Adoption, Criminal
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Christopher M. Nolen

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal, White Collar Crime
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Stuart C. Vess

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
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Richard L. Mays

Real Estate, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Accident & Injury
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LEGAL TERMS

BOOKING

A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed beh... (more...)
A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed behind bars. Nowadays, the book is likely to be a computer. Usually, a mug shot and fingerprints are taken, and the arrestee's clothing and personal effects are inventoried and stored.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

LINEUP

A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the c... (more...)
A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the crime scene. The police are supposed to choose similar-looking people to appear with the suspect. If the suspect alone matches the physical description of the perpetrator, evidence of the identification can be attacked at trial. For example, if the robber is described as a Latino male, and the suspect, a Latino male, is placed in a lineup with ten white males, a witness' identification of him as the robber will be challenged by the defense attorney.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

CONVICTION

A finding by a judge or jury that the defendant is guilty of a crime.

PROBABLE CAUSE

The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a searc... (more...)
The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a search warrant allowing the police to conduct a search or arrest a suspect. Reliable information must show that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and the suspect is involved.