Little Rock RICO Act Lawyer, Arkansas

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Valerie Lynne Goudie Lawyer

Valerie Lynne Goudie

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate, Civil & Human Rights

Valerie Palmedo-Goudie graduated from Auburn University in 1986 where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree. She graduated from Washington and Lee Scho... (more)

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Pamela  Panasiuk Lawyer

Pamela Panasiuk

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Social Security -- Disability, Traffic

Pamela Epperson Panasiuk provides aggressive, thorough and personalized representation to individuals accused of crimes. She will protect an accuser's... (more)

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Matthew Porter McKay Lawyer

Matthew Porter McKay

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Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor
I defend the accused, innocent, or guilty. I handle felony and misdemeanor cases.

Like many of my clients, I was born and raised in Arkansas by a single mother. I went to high school, college and law school in Little Rock. While in ... (more)

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Judson Candler Kidd Lawyer

Judson Candler Kidd

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Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

I was exposed to law at an early age as my grandfather and father were trial lawyers, grandmother was a court reporter and my uncle was a US Marshall.... (more)

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William Price Feland Lawyer

William Price Feland

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

William Price Feland is a practicing lawyer in the state of Arkansas.

Robert Alston Newcomb Lawyer

Robert Alston Newcomb

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment

Mr. Newcomb proudly represents clients in need of Criminal and Employment matters.

Lisa Gail Douglas Lawyer

Lisa Gail Douglas

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Accident & Injury, Health Care, Social Security, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Focus of practice is injury, accidents and social security disability.

Talk to a Nurse/Attorney. Voted Best Attorney 4 consecutive years in the Stephens Media NLR Times Poll. Lisa Douglas has been licensed as a Register... (more)

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David W. Kamps

Criminal, Litigation
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Laura Robertson

Farms, Child Support, Adoption, Criminal
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Christopher M. Nolen

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal, White Collar Crime
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LEGAL TERMS

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.