Madison Estate Lawyer, Mississippi

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William James Dukes Lawyer

William James Dukes

VERIFIED
Business, Estate, Intellectual Property, Power of Attorney, Tax

A Mississippi native, William J. Dukes pursued graduate studies in physics before law school. Mr. Dukes focuses his practice on the needs of small bus... (more)

Owen P. Lalor Lawyer

Owen P. Lalor

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Business, Estate, Workers' Compensation

Owen P. Lalor received his Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Economics from St. Louis University, received his Juris Doctor from Vanderbilt Univ... (more)

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800-758-9910

Baskin  Jones Lawyer
Baskin Jones
is a Top Attorney Award winner at Attorney.com. Only 5% have the elite qualifications. Click the badge for more info.

Baskin Jones

Baskin Jones is a Top Attorney Award winner at Attorney.com. Only 5% have the elite qualifications. Click the badge for more info.
VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Estate, Business, Lawsuit & Dispute
Helping injured people fight the insurance company. 18-wheeler, car wreck, wrongful death attorneys.

Mr. Jones’s practice includes all types of injuries, and death caused by the negligence of a person or business. Many injuries occur on the roadwa... (more)

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601-272-2406

Tammy L Barham

International Tax, Litigation, Estate Administration
Status:  In Good Standing           
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R David Marchetti

Commercial Real Estate, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Corporate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jay A. Norris

Tax, Estate Planning, Transactions, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ashley Nicole Wicks

Banking & Finance, Commercial Real Estate, Gift Taxation, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           

James P. Knight

Tax, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Benjamin Powell Sones

Corporate, Entertainment, Credit & Debt, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Benjamin Powell Sones

Corporate, Entertainment, Credit & Debt, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Madison Estate Lawyers and Madison Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

QTIP TRUST

A type of trust for wealthy married couples that allows a surviving spouse to postpone estate taxes. A QTIP trust allows the surviving spouse to make use of the... (more...)
A type of trust for wealthy married couples that allows a surviving spouse to postpone estate taxes. A QTIP trust allows the surviving spouse to make use of the trust property tax-free. Taxes are deferred until the surviving spouse dies and the trust property is received by the final trust beneficiaries, who were named by the first spouse to die.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

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