Martinsville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Indiana

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Andrew J. Thompson Lawyer

Andrew J. Thompson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Criminal, Real Estate, Business
Over 30 Years of Legal Experience.

Andrew J Thompson was admitted to practice law in Indiana in 1990. Mr. Thompson has experience in business law, estate planning, creditor and debtor l... (more)

Brett Michael Haworth Lawyer

Brett Michael Haworth

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate

Attorney Brett M. Haworth was born in Rensselaer, Indiana. He focuses in personal injury law, business law, insurance law, real estate law, family law... (more)

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800-970-3690

Donald Wayne Mcinnes Lawyer

Donald Wayne Mcinnes

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Collection, Estate, Real Estate, Personal Injury

Don has been exclusively practicing community association law across Indiana for almost a decade. He is a member of Community Associations Institute ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-903-8920

Richard A. Mann

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Lisa Marie Joachim

Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Bankruptcy Litigation, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer R. Mann

Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Family Law, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Todd D. Small

Child Support, Adoption, Corporate, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Glen Emmett Koch

Litigation, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Rex Padgett

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Estate Planning, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel W. Kiehl

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

CONSORTIUM

(1) A group of separate individuals or companies that come together to undertake an enterprise or transaction that is beyond the means of any one member. For ex... (more...)
(1) A group of separate individuals or companies that come together to undertake an enterprise or transaction that is beyond the means of any one member. For example, a group of local businesses may form a consortium to fund and construct a new office complex. (2) The duties and rights associated with marriage. Consortium includes all the tangible and intangible benefits that one spouse derives from the other, including material support, companionship, affection, guidance and sexual relations. The term may arise in a lawsuit if a spouse brings a claim against a third party for 'loss of consortium' after the other spouse is injured or killed.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.