Norcross Estate Lawyer, Georgia

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John G. Walrath Lawyer

John G. Walrath

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
General Practice Attorney in Metro Atlanta

The Law Offices of John G. Walrath is a small, aggressive and experienced Georgia law firm handling both civil and criminal cases throughout the State... (more)

Mark Anderst Nestor Lawyer

Mark Anderst Nestor

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Estate, Criminal, Real Estate, Traffic

Attorney Nestor has been licensed to practice in the state of Georgia since 1995. He helps clients in Accident & Injury, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Tr... (more)

Brian Clark Near Lawyer

Brian Clark Near

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Accident & Injury, Estate

Brian Near began his legal practice in 1989 with a law firm located in the former IBM Tower (One Atlantic Center) in midtown Atlanta. He later moved h... (more)

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Matthew McGahren

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Victor Herng-Chin Kang

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Glen Daryl Rubin

Wills & Probate, Reorganization, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey Chad Horn

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Jeffrey Chad Horn

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter Lawrence Lublin

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kara C. Fleming

Power of Attorney, Wills, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Norcross Estate Lawyers and Norcross Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.