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Portland Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Oregon


Collin C. McKean Lawyer

Collin C. McKean

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Real Estate, Domestic Violence & Neglect
We protect what is important to our clients, helping them navigate difficult transitions.

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Gregory P. Oliveros Lawyer

Gregory P. Oliveros

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Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury

Gregory Paul Oliveros was born and raised in the Portland area. After graduating from the Oregon College of Education in 1973, he taught in the Por... (more)

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800-797-7891

David Charles Clarke Lawyer

David Charles Clarke

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury

I began my career in industry as a process engineer in the fledgling semiconductor manufacturing sector and ended it as an engineering manager for a s... (more)

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800-299-6770

Lesley  Herring Lawyer

Lesley Herring

Family Law, Elder Law, Wills & Probate

Hobson and Associates was initially established as David N. Hobson, P.C. in 1978. In 1985 and the firm name changed to Hobson and Hobson, P.C.. We p... (more)

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David N. Hobson, Jr. Lawyer

David N. Hobson, Jr.

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce

Hobson and Associates was initially established as David N. Hobson, P.C. in 1978 when my father, David N. Hobson, opened our first office on the south... (more)

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Larry K. Gray Lawyer

Larry K. Gray

VERIFIED
Divorce, Elder Law, Trusts, Child Custody, Wills & Probate

At Larry K. Gray & Associates P.C., the emphasis and focus are to provide sound advice, top quality document preparation, and/or reasoned advocacy for... (more)

Beth A. Allen

Administrative Law, Adoption, Affirmative Action, Age Discrimination, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

David W. Owens

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Real Estate, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

QUALIFIED MEDICAL CHILD SUPPORT ORDER (QMSCO)

A court order that provides health benefit coverage for the child of the noncustodial parent under that parent's group health plan.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.