Sacramento White Collar Crime Lawyer, California

Sponsored Law Firm


Robert M Wilson Lawyer

Robert M Wilson

VERIFIED
White Collar Crime, Criminal, Business, Wrongful Death, Accident & Injury
Practice focused on litigation and trial

Robert Wilson’s practice focuses on white collar criminal defense, child protection litigation, professional negligence and complex business litigat... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

916-441-0888

Eric H Hintz Lawyer

Eric H Hintz

DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime, Juvenile Law

Eric H. Hintz is a criminal defense attorney in Sacramento, California. A partner with his firm, Law Offices of Hintz & Welch, Mr. Hintz represents cl... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-631-8640

Malcolm S. Segal

White Collar Crime, Corporate, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

James P. Mayo

State Appellate Practice, Federal Appellate Practice, White Collar Crime, Professional Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Nancy King

Divorce & Family Law, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey A Silvia

Employment, White Collar Crime, Products Liability, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Jonathan Charles Turner

White Collar Crime, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Mark Joseph Reichel

White Collar Crime, Criminal, Securities Fraud , Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Bradley Wishek

White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dennis L Beck

Litigation, Energy, State Government, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find Sacramento White Collar Crime Lawyers and Sacramento White Collar Crime Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.