Los Angeles White Collar Crime Lawyer, California

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Gina  Tennen Lawyer

Gina Tennen

VERIFIED
Criminal, Military, Juvenile Law, White Collar Crime, RICO Act

LibertyBell Law Group consists of a group of elite criminal defense attorneys who have become some of the most sought after lawyers in the nation. Our... (more)

Stephanie  Ames Lawyer

Stephanie Ames

Criminal, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Felony, RICO Act

Stephanie Ames is a trial and appellate attorney whose work is largely focused on white collar crime. She has extensive experience in a wide variety o... (more)

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310-739-5952

Stephanie  Ames Lawyer

Stephanie Ames

VERIFIED
Felony, White Collar Crime, RICO Act, Misdemeanor, Criminal

From California state criminal charges to complex federal investigations, Stephanie Ames has the experience, legal knowledge and strategic sense to pr... (more)

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Ruzanna  Poghosyan Lawyer

Ruzanna Poghosyan

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Misdemeanor

Having been employed by the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, an Encino, CA, lawyer Ruzanna Poghosyan has the background and experience... (more)

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800-908-8530

Paula  Drake Lawyer

Paula Drake

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
It is our goal to provide a vigorous, individualized defense
for our clients.

Bad things really do happen to good people. If you find yourself, a friend, or a family member being accused of a crime or under investigation - time ... (more)

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844-529-3649

Karren  Kenney Lawyer

Karren Kenney

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, Felony, Misdemeanor

Karren Kenney was a Deputy Public Defender for almost 12 years where she became one of the best Orange County criminal defense attorneys, defending ev... (more)

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800-735-6750

Steve Meister

Family Law, Government Agencies, White Collar Crime, Election & Political
Status:  In Good Standing           

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David D. Yang

Administrative Law, Mental Health, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE (DUI)

The crime of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, including prescription drugs. Complete intoxication is not required; the l... (more...)
The crime of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, including prescription drugs. Complete intoxication is not required; the level of alcohol or drugs in the driver's body must simply be enough to prevent him from thinking clearly or driving safely. State laws specify the levels of blood alcohol content at which a person is presumed to be under the influence. Also called driving while intoxicated (DWI and drunk driving).

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.