Salem Misdemeanor Lawyer, Oregon


Mark J Geiger Lawyer

Mark J Geiger

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, Juvenile Law
Committed to Protecting the Rights of the Accused

You may be wondering how to choose the right law office when you are in need of legal representation. There are plenty of options in Salem, Oregon, bu... (more)

Gig  Wyatt Lawyer

Gig Wyatt

VERIFIED
Criminal, Personal Injury

Mr. Wyatt has been a criminal defense lawyer since 1985 and has tried literally hundreds of jury trials. His practice focuses upon criminal defense an... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-787-0430

Mark G. Obert Lawyer

Mark G. Obert

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Real Estate

Committed to delivering quality legal counsel at an affordable price to businesses, individuals, and organizations. Johnstone & Obert is a law firm... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

503-472-9555

Robert G Higgins

Criminal, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Lemarr E Carver

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Daniel Joshua Lounsbury

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Howard Collins

Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Elaine Smith-Koop

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Joseph W Hollander

State Government, Government, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Joseph W. Hollander

State Government, Government, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CRIMINAL CASE

A lawsuit brought by a prosecutor employed by the federal, state or local government that charges a person with the commission of a crime.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

INFORMATION

The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or ... (more...)
The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or a misdemeanor. The information tells the defendant what crime he is charged with, against whom and when the offense allegedly occurred, but the prosecutor is not obliged to go into great detail. If the defendant wants more specifics, he must ask for it by way of a discovery request. Compare indictment.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.