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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Benjamin L. Lawrence Lawyer

Benjamin L. Lawrence

VERIFIED
Family Law
Greater Salt Lake City Family Law Attorney

Benjamin Lawrence focuses on developing quality relationships with clients and providing them with dedicated and personalized service. Ben graduate... (more)

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801-872-2222

Elizabeth A. Hruby-Mills

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer H. Mastrorocco

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Huy Vu

Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Spencer Pratt Call

Family Law, Construction, Corporate, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer Ha

Foreclosure, Family Law, Business Organization, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan H. Rupp

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Janice R. Olson

Corporate, Family Law, Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly J. Trupiano

Family Law, Civil Rights, Immigration, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Stephen M Enderton

Family Law, Criminal, Insurance, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Tangren Family Trust v. Tangren

... Under the terms of the Lease, Richard, as trustee of the Tangren Family Trust, agreed to lease the property to Rodney for ninety-nine years at $275 ... is integrated is a question of fact reviewed for clear error, [8] and whether a contract is ambiguous is a question of law reviewed for ...

Arbogast Family Trust v. River Crossings

... in the trial court, it has not appeared and is not entitled to service under rule 5 of the Utah Rules of Civil Procedure." Arbogast Family Trust v. River Crossings, LLC, 2008 UT App 277, ¶ 16, 191 P.3d 39. ¶ 24 Although we identify a trend in our own case law toward requiring ...

Pearson v. Pearson

... Where the legislature has expressed public policy, particularly in the family law area, I believe that we should look first to that statutory policy, rather than relying on old common law precedent that predates the statutes, notwithstanding the parties' failure in this instance to frame ...

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