Shreveport Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Louisiana

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Mark Daniel Frederick Lawyer

Mark Daniel Frederick

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate
General Legal Services in Northwest Louisiana.

Mark D. Frederick has over 20 years of legal experience, enabling him to handle the demands of your case regardless of the complexities involved. As y... (more)

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318-868-7300

Richard Eugene Griffith Lawyer

Richard Eugene Griffith

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Divorce

Shreveport native, Richard E. Griffith practices in all areas of family law including adoption, child custody, and divorce. Griffith has been in ... (more)

Thomas A. Bordelon Lawyer

Thomas A. Bordelon

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Accident & Injury, Business, Criminal

THOMAS A. BORDELON was born in San Antonio, Texas on December 6, 1959. Mr. Bordelon graduated cum laude from Louisiana State University at Shreveport... (more)

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800-865-9541

J Ransdell Keene Lawyer

J Ransdell Keene

VERIFIED
Criminal, Personal Injury, Family Law

Practicing law for more than 40 years, J. Ransdell Keene is a trusted legal ally for clients throughout the Shreveport area and across Louisiana. As a... (more)

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CONTACT

800-951-6021

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Henry  Goodrich Lawyer

Henry Goodrich

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Estate

My office is primarily dedicated to helping resolve family conflict. The cost of conflict - especially when children are involved - can be too high. F... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-715-0860

J. Dhu Thompson Lawyer

J. Dhu Thompson

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce, Child Custody, Family Law

Dhu Thompson is a criminal defense, family law, and catastrophic injury lawyer in Louisiana. After graduating from Southern University Law School in 2... (more)

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CONTACT

800-970-3561

W. Michael Adams

Estate Planning, Employment, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert Kennedy

Employment, Family Law, Corporate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

W. Lake Hearne

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Constitutional Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

John B Benton

Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Shreveport Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Shreveport Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.