Baton Rouge Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Louisiana


Drew  Louviere Lawyer

Drew Louviere

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Years of Experience at a Reasonable Price

Attorney Drew Louviere of Drew M. Louviere Pro Law Corp assists residents with DWI charges in and around East Baton Rouge County including Baton Rouge... (more)

Kathryn Jakuback Burke Lawyer

Kathryn Jakuback Burke

VERIFIED
Criminal, Family Law, Immigration, Federal Appellate Practice, State Appellate Practice

Kathryn graduated from LSU’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center in 2017. During law school she was an active participant in Moot Court and Trial Advocacy. Du... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-877-9280

Mark  Lazarre Lawyer

Mark Lazarre

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Estate, Accident & Injury

Based in Baton Rouge, Mark Lazarre of the Lazarre Law Firm provides exceptional legal representation to businesses and individuals across Louisiana. B... (more)

Ralph  Tureau Lawyer

Ralph Tureau

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Business, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate

Ralph Tureau has over 45 years of courtroom experience. He is Licensed to practice in all state district courts of Louisiana and in the United States... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

225-647-9999

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Wyman Earl Bankston Lawyer

Wyman Earl Bankston

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

Wyman spent the first four years of his practice with a national firm primarily representing insurance companies in losses sustained as a result of Hu... (more)

Jennifer M. Moisant

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Construction, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Steve LeBlanc

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey S. Wittenbrink

Litigation, Intellectual Property, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Goldie C Domingue

International, Government Agencies, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Norma Beedle

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.