Somerville Estate Planning Lawyer, New Jersey

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Tiffany Jean Moore Lawyer

Tiffany Jean Moore

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Residential Real Estate, Landlord-Tenant, Estate Planning, Contract, Traffic
Real Estate Closings, Per Diem Litigation, Landlord/Tenant Court, Municipal Court

Tiffany Moore is a practicing attorney in the state of New Jersey. Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire How did you build a successful practice? M... (more)

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Katherine E. Ingrassia

Estate Planning
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G. Robert Marcus

Merger & Acquisition, Medical Products & Devices, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randall S. Lainer

International, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Estate
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A. Nichole Cipriani

Estate Planning, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paula Maria Simpkins

Corporate, Estate Planning, Securities, Internet
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Michael Caruso

Personal Injury, Traffic, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Shotmeyer v. NJ Realty Title Ins. Co.

... or conveyance of such estate or interest. . . . As part of their estate planning, the Shotmeyers formed the limited partnership, Beaver Run Farms, LP, on December 30, 1991. SB Properties, Inc., a corporation owned jointly and ...

In re Estate of Stockdale

953 A.2d 454 (2008). 196 NJ 275. In the Matter of the ESTATE OF Madeleine L. STOCKDALE, Deceased. A-121 September Term 2006. Supreme Court of New Jersey. Argued October 9, 2007. Decided July 22, 2008. 457 Frederick ...

Finderne Mgmt. Co. v. Barrett

... The brothers agreed that additional estate planning strategies "such as retitling assets, new wills, new trusts, and some other financial planning" techniques were necessary to "reduce the estate tax[es] down to a meaningful level" and, in planning for their retirement, to provide a ...