Warren Criminal Lawyer, Michigan

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Brent  Jaffe Lawyer

Brent Jaffe

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony, Traffic

Upon passing the bar Attorney Brent Jaffe joined his father's firm to form Jaffe Law Group. "I was drawn to the practice of law because this professio... (more)

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248-522-9545

Larry O. Smith Lawyer

Larry O. Smith

VERIFIED
Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Juvenile Law, Power of Attorney

Larry Smith is a practicing lawyer in Sterling Heights, Michigan and the surrounding areas.

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800-697-5071

Elliot D. Margolis Lawyer

Elliot D. Margolis

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Mr. Margolis has been rated “highly qualified” by judges and other attorneys, according to legal rating service Martindale-Hubbell. He is a member... (more)

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800-813-2601

Lyle B. Harris Lawyer

Lyle B. Harris

VERIFIED
Criminal, Juvenile Law

Lyle Harris is a practicing lawyer in the state of Michigan. Attorney Harris received his J.D. from the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law.

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Jeffery D Maynard Lawyer

Jeffery D Maynard

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute

The attorneys of Maynard Law Associates, PLLC are skilled at walking our clients through each step of the complicated legal process. If you are co... (more)

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586-944-2656

Derrick E. George Lawyer

Derrick E. George

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Estate

Over the last decade, Derrick George, Attorney & Counselor at Law, has served countless individuals and business owners in the Metro-Detroit area, hel... (more)

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800-970-0141

Dean  Elliott Lawyer

Dean Elliott

VERIFIED
Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Employment, Accident & Injury, Business

Co-Counsel on the largest police misconduct verdict in Michigan history and the largest verdict in Michigan this year! On November 3, 2016, a jury in... (more)

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800-724-2091

Richard M. Halprin Lawyer

Richard M. Halprin

VERIFIED
Criminal, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Litigation

As an experienced attorney and district court magistrate, Richard Halprin has cultivated a network of relationships within the legal community, includ... (more)

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800-942-4470

Ray E. Richards, II Lawyer

Ray E. Richards, II

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, RICO Act, Felony, Personal Injury

Attorney Ray E. Richards II has been practicing law in Michigan since 1997. Attorney Richards achieved amazing accomplishments throughout his law educ... (more)

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800-903-0341

Cecil D. St. Pierre Lawyer

Cecil D. St. Pierre

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Criminal

Cecil D. St. Pierre, Jr., who is a partner at Boyer, St. Pierre & Aull, PLLC, became licensed in 1984. St. Pierre has concentrated his practice in t... (more)

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800-942-1270

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LEGAL TERMS

BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT

The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced '... (more...)
The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced 'to a moral certainty.' The jury must be convinced that the defendant committed each element of the crime before returning a guilty verdict.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. Sargent

... PER CURIAM. We granted leave to appeal in this case to consider whether offense variable 9 (number of victims) (OV 9) can be scored using uncharged acts that did not occur during the same criminal transaction as the sentencing offenses. ...

People v. Petri

... Following a jury trial, defendant was convicted of second-degree criminal sexual conduct, MCL 750.520c(1)(a) (sexual contact with a person under 13), and was sentenced as a second-offense habitual offender, MCL 769.10, to imprisonment for a minimum of 14 years and 10 ...

People v. Horn

... A jury convicted defendant of kidnapping, MCL 750.349, and four counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, MCL 750.520b. The trial court sentenced defendant as a second-offense habitual offender, MCL 769.10, to five concurrent sentences of 40 to 60 years in prison. ...