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Wilmington Estate Lawyer, North Carolina


Don Tolbert Evans Lawyer

Don Tolbert Evans

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Criminal, Motor Vehicle, Estate
Firm has 35 years experience, continuing a family tradition of lawyers stretching back 100 years.

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. Successfully defended a major... (more)

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Melissa  Gott Lawyer

Melissa Gott

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Mediation
Clayton Williams Cheek Lawyer

Clayton Williams Cheek

VERIFIED
Business, Bankruptcy & Debt, Commercial Bankruptcy, Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate

Clayton Cheek received his B. S. degree in English from Wake Forest University, his MBA from Wake Forest University and his J. D. from Wake Forest Uni... (more)

Woody E. White

Contract, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Benjamin Douglas Williams

Social Security -- Disability, Medical Malpractice, Workers' Compensation, Wills
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James W Zisa

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Divorce
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Thomas G. Varnum

Constitutional Law, Copyright, Criminal, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas H. Nunalee

Gift Taxation, Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Living Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph C. Hearne

Corporate, Business Organization, Collection, Estate Planning
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Carmen Elliott Nunalee

Contract, Disability, Elder Law, Estate Administration
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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Wilmington Estate Lawyers and Wilmington Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

LIFE BENEFICIARY

A person who receives benefits, under a trust or by will, for his or her lifetime. For an example, see AB trust.

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.